The Diary of a Young Girl

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Penguin, 2009 - Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) - 350 pages
2 Reviews
In Amsterdam, in the summer of 1942, the Nazis forced teenager Anne Frank and her family into hiding. For over two years, they, another family and a German dentist lived in a 'secret annexe', fearing discovery. All that time, Anne kept a diary. An intimate record of tension and struggle, adolescence and confinement, anger and heartbreak, Anne Frank's diary is one of those unique documents, famed throughout the world, that portrays innocence and humanity, suffering and survival in the starkest and most moving terms.

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As i started to read this book i knew i would be moved to search more into Anne Franks life and how if it wasn't for the war Anne would have lived a longer life. it moved me to emotion when i read the end chapter called the legacy of Anne frank. in some respects i sympathised with Anne on aspects about her mother that she stated. This Diary of a Young Girl has exceptionally funny bits ( imagine! these bits were actually lived through) and sad bits. so sad it moves you to tears. You are able to get angry that anyone would make someone retreat into hiding. And some parts were you go "aah thats cute" and parts were you are in stitches with laughter.
Anne Frank may not have lead a long life bit in those dozen years or so she lived through many emotions from fear to anger, to joy and sadness.
For You Anne.
 

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This book offers a powerful incite to the life of Anne Frank. Her diary is hard to put down and creates an amazing incite into a life in hiding. A MUST READ !

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About the author (2009)

Anne Frank, June 1929 - March 1945 Anneliesse Marie Frank was born on June 12, 1929 in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany. She was the second daughter of Otto and Edith Frank. Anne's father was a factory worker, who moved his family to Amsterdam in 1933 to escape the Nazi's. There he opened up a branch of his uncle's company and Anne and her sister Margot resumed a normal life, attending a Montessori School in Amsterdam. The Germans attacked the Netherlands in 1940 and took control, issuing anti-Jewish decrees, and forcing the Frank sisters into a Jewish Lyceum instead of their old school. Their father Otto decided to find a place for the family to hide should the time come that the Nazi's came to take them to a concentration camp. He chose the annex above his offices and found some trustworthy friends among his fellow workers to supply the family with food and news. On July 5, 1942, Margot received a "call up" to serve in the Nazi "work camp." The next day, the family escaped to the annex, welcoming another family, the van Pels, which consisted of Hermann and Auguste van Pels and their son Peter. Fritz Pfeffer also came to stay with them, causing the count to come to eight people hiding in the annex. Anne, Margot and Peter continued their studies under the tutelage of Otto, and all of the captives found ways to entertain themselves for the long years they remained hidden. On August 4, 1944, four Dutch Nazis came to arrest the eight, having discovered their hiding place through an informant. Anne's diary was left behind and found later by one of the family's friends. The eight were taken to prison in Amsterdam and then deported to Westerbork before being shipped to Auschwitz. At Auschwitz, the men were separated from the women and Hermann van Pels was immediately gassed. Fritz Pfeffer died at Neuenganme in 1944. Anne, Margot and Mrs. van Pels were taken to Bergen-Belson, leaving behind Anne's mother, Edith, who died at Auschwitz of starvation and exhaustion in 1945. At Bergen-Belson, Anne and Margot contracted typhus and died of the disease in March of 1945. Anne was 15 and Margot was 17. The exact date and the place they were buried is unknown. Otto Frank was the only one of the original group of eight who were hidden in the annex to survive. He was left for dead at Auschwitz when the Russian Army came to liberate the camp. It is due to him that Anne's diary was published and became the success it is.

Mirjam Pressler was born on June 18, 1940 in Darmstadt, Germany. She is the author of several novels that have won awards in her native Germany and also received high praise from critics after being translated into English. In Malka and Halinka Pressler focuses on young Jewish protagonists who have been forced by fate to endure the Holocaust, while in Shylock's Daughter she returns readers to fifteenth-century Italy as she attempts to answer haunting questions surrounding the motivations of characters in a popular play by William Shakespeare. While receiving notice for her novels, Pressler is most well known for her work revising the diaries of Jewish Holocaust victim Anne Frank, and she is considered an expert on Franks's life and writings. She made the finalist for the Hans Christian Andersen Awards 2016 in the author category.

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