Forge-practice (elementary)

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J. Wiley & Sons, 1908 - Blacksmithing - 279 pages
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Page 76 - When reducing the decimals, the dimensions which have to do only with the bending of the hook, that is, the opening, the length, the length of point, etc., may be taken as the nearest i6th, but these dimensions for flattening should be reduced to the nearest 32d on small hooks.
Page 216 - FIG. 249. hammer is again reversed, bringing the large end uppermost and the pene in the water. The face end is polished and tempered in the same way as the small end. If the large end is properly hardened before the temper color appears on. the small end, the hammer may be taken completely out of the water and the large end also polished, the colors being watched for on both ends at once. As soon as one end shows the proper color it is promptly dipped in water, the other end following as soon as...
Page 96 - Thus the diameter of the central shaft would be 2", the thickness of the ends 2\", etc. On larger work \" is sometimes allowed for machining. The amount of finish allowed depends to a large extent on the way the forging is to be finished.
Page 38 - Frequently there are several equally good methods of scarfing for the same sort of weld, and it should be remembered that the method given here is not necessarily the only way in which the particular weld can be made. Fig. 47 shows one way of scarfing for a right-angle weld made of flat iron. Both pieces are scarfed exactly alike. The scarfing is done with the pene end of the hammer. If necessary the ends of the pieces may be upset before scarfing. As in all other welds, care must be taken to so...
Page 155 - For the second step the ball is flattened to about the thickness of the finished eye and the hole punched under the steam hammer with an ordinary punch, leaving the work as shown at C. The final shaping is done with the finishing die D. This die is so shaped that when the two parts are together, the hole left is exactly the shape of the finished forging. In the first die it will...
Page 198 - If the point does become too hot, it should not be dipped in water to cool off, but allowed to cool in the air to below the hardening heat and then reheated more carefully. When...
Page 202 - Fig. 120. the same temper. Sometimes tools are left much harder. In one quite well known plant the tools are simply reheated until the water evaporates from the cutting end, indicating a reheating to a temperature of about 200F. Cutting off Tools are forged with the blade either on one side or in the center of the stock. The easier way to make them is to forge the blade with one side flush with the side of the tool. Such a tool is shown in Fig. 121. The cutting edge, A, the extreme tip of the blade,...
Page 199 - ... fine file, which should scratch it slightly. If the grain is too coarse, the tool should be rehardened at a lower temperature, while if the metal is too soft, it should be rehardened at a higher temperature. Cape-chisel. — The cape-chisel, illustrated in Fig. 230, is used for cutting grooves and working at the bottom of narrow channels. The cutting edge A should be wider than any part of the blade back to B, which should be somewhat thinner in order that the blade may "clear" when working in...
Page 157 - Fig. 161 at A, where the dotted lines show the shape of the forging, the solid lines the shape of the die. The object of the above is this : If the hole is semicircular in section, the stock, being larger than the smaller parts of the hole, after a blow will be left like B, the metal being forced out between the flat faces of the die and forming fins. When the bar is turned these fins are worked back and make a "cold shut". When the hole is a modified semicircle the stock will be formed like C, and...
Page 82 - The jaw is tapered down as shown at E. The last step is to punch the hole for the rivet. It is always a good plan to slightly crease the inside face of the jaw with a fuller, as this insures the jaws gripping the work firmly with the edges, and not touching it simply at one point in the center, as they sometimes do if this crease is not made. The...

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