NATO's Empty Victory: A Postmortem on the Balkan War

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Ted Galen Carpenter
Cato Institute, 2000 - Political Science - 194 pages
NATO political leaders claim that the war against Yugoslavia was a great victory, the authors of these essays disagree. The war lasted for longer than anticipated and triggered a refugee crisis. The book offers proposals for preventing the victory becoming an aven bigger policy fiasco.
 

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NATO's Empty Victory: A Postmortem on the Balkan War

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Within days of the end of the fighting, policy-oriented scholars began writing up the lessons and meaning of the Kosovo conflict (March-June 1999). The arguments assembled in this collection probe ... Read full review

NATO's Empty Victory

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Within days of the end of the fighting, policy-oriented scholars began writing up the lessons and meaning of the Kosovo conflict (March-June 1999). The arguments assembled in this collection probe ... Read full review

Contents

1 Miscalculations and Blunders Lead to War
11
2 NATOs Myths and Bogus Justifications for Intervention
21
3 NATOs Hypocritical Humanitarianism
31
THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE WAR
49
4 Collateral Damage in Yugoslavia
51
5 Headaches for Neighboring Countries
59
6 Damage to Relations with Russia and China
77
7 Another Blow to Americas Constitution
93
WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?
121
The Inevitability and Costs of a Greater Albania
123
10 The Case for Partitioning Kosovo
133
11 Alternatives to a NATODominated Balkans
139
Renewed Interest in EuropeanRun Security Institutions
155
The Perils of the New NATO
171
Contributors
185
Index
187

8 Setting Dangerous International Precedents
107

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Page 17 - NATO personnel shall enjoy, together with their vehicles, vessels, aircraft, and equipment, free and unrestricted passage and unimpeded access throughout the FRY including associated airspace and territorial waters. This shall include, but not be limited to, the right of bivouac, maneuver, billet, and utilization of any areas or facilities as required for support, training, and operations.

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