The Adventures of a Lady in Tartary, Thibet, China, & Kashmir. With an Account of the Journey from the Punjab to Bombay Overland, Volume 2

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Hope and Company, 1853 - China
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Page 110 - Who has not heard of the Vale of Cashmere, With its roses the brightest that earth ever gave, Its temples, and grottos, and fountains as clear As the love-lighted eyes that hang over their wave? Oh ! to see it at sunset, — when warm o'er the Lake Its splendour at parting a summer eve throws, Like a bride, full of blushes, when ling'ring to take A last look of her mirror at night ere she goes...
Page 185 - I have not loved the world, nor the world me ; I have not flattered its rank breath, nor bowed To its idolatries a patient knee, — Nor coined my cheek to smiles, — nor cried aloud In worship of an echo ; in the crowd They could not deem me one of such ; I stood Among them, but not of them...
Page 110 - Or to see it by moonlight, — when mellowly shines The light o'er its palaces, gardens, and shrines ; When the water-falls gleam, like a quick fall of stars, And the nightingale's hymn from the Isle of Chenars Is broken by laughs and light echoes of feet From the cool, shining walks where the young people meet. — Or at morn, when the magic of daylight awakes A new wonder each minute, as slowly it breaks, Hills, cupolas, fountains, called forth every one Out of darkness, as if but just born of...
Page 111 - Haram of night-flowers stealing away ; And the wind, full of wantonness, woos like a lover The young aspen-trees, till they tremble all over. When the East is as warm as the light of first hopes, And Day, with his banner of radiance unfurl'd, Shines in through the mountainous portal that opes, Sublime, from that Valley of bliss to the world...
Page 111 - There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore ; There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar : I love not man the less, but nature more...
Page 268 - ... vows seem sweet in every whisper'd word; and gentle winds and waters near make music to the lonely ear. Each flower the dews have lightly wet, and in the sky the stars are met, and on the wave is deeper blue, and on the leaf a browner hue, and in the heaven that clear obscure, so softly dark and darkly pure, which follows the decline of day, as twilight melts beneath the moon away.
Page 189 - Tis sweet to hear the watch-dog's honest bark Bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw near home; Tis sweet to know there is an eye will mark Our coming, and look brighter when we come...
Page 163 - The sportive toil, which, short and light, Had dyed her glowing hue so bright, Served too in hastier swell to show Short glimpses of a breast of snow ; What though no rule of courtly grace To measured mood had...
Page 93 - The bridge itself is entirely made of twigs, and the bushes which are despoiled for this material grow close to the banks of the river. These twigs are twisted into ropes of an inch and a half or two inches in diameter, and three or four of these twig-ropes form each of the sides of the bridge. The flooring of the construction is of twigs formed into ropes, and placed lengthwise from pier to pier, across the gulf.
Page 268 - Such in her chaplet infant Dian wove, And Innocence would offer to her love. These deck the shore ; the waves their...

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