Thinking In Time: The Uses Of History For Decision Makers

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Simon and Schuster, Aug 23, 2011 - Business & Economics - 352 pages
2 Reviews
“A convincing case that careful analysis of the history, issues, individuals, and institutions can lead to better decisions—in business as well as in government” (BusinessWeek).

Two noted professors offer easily remembered rules for using history effectively in day-to-day management of governmental and corporate affairs to avoid costly blunders. “An illuminating guide to the use and abuse of history in affairs of state” (Arthur Schlesinger).
 

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Thinking in time: the uses of history for decision-makers

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Two professors of government analyze both political disasters and successes of recent decades to provide telling lessons on how to use history to improve decision-making. A dozen case studies are ... Read full review

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Read bits of this for my dissertation.
boring

Contents

The Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962
2
A Second Success
17
Unreasoning from Analogies
34
The Seducer and the Kid Next Door
58
Dodging Botheisome Analogues
75
Finding History That Fits
111
Probing Presumptions
134
Placing Strangers
157
Noticing Pattems
196
Placing Organizations
212
A Summary
232
Seeing Time as a Stream
247
Acknowledgments
271
Notes
295
Index
320
Copyright

Placing Across Barriers
181

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About the author (2011)

Richard E. Neustadt is Douglas Dillon Professor of Government in the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. For three decades an advisor to presidents, their aides, and to members of the cabinet, he is the author of Alliance Politics and the influential study, Presidential Power.

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