Invisible Helpers

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Theosophical Book Concern, 1915 - Theosophy - 138 pages
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Page 120 - Whosoever will be saved: before all things it is necessary that he hold the Catholic Faith. Which Faith, except every one do keep whole and undefiled: without doubt he shall perish everlastingly.
Page 49 - Though the mills of God grind slowly, yet they grind exceeding small; Though with patience he stands waiting, with exactness grinds he all.
Page 127 - ... plane which to us is the merest name. As Professor Rhys Davids explains: "He is now free from all sin; he sees and values all things in this life at their true value; all evil being rooted from his mind, he experiences only righteous desires for himself, and tender pity and regard and exalted love for others.
Page 93 - ... his being at all aware that it comes from external agency. A pupil, too, may often be employed as an agent in what can hardly be described otherwise than as the answering of prayer; for though it is true that any earnest spiritual desire, such as might be supposed to find its expression in prayer, is itself a force which automatically brings about certain results, it is also a fact that such a spiritual effort offers an opportunity of influence to the Powers of Good, of which they are not slow...
Page 128 - If a man remain steadfastly in this state of mind all the while he is awake, whether he be standing, walking, sitting, or lying down, then is come to pass the saying " Even in this world holiness has been found.
Page 61 - In the latter we have indeed an exact reproduction of the physical body, but it is created by a mental effort out of matter entirely foreign to that body, and is no more capable of acting upon it by repercussion than an ordinary marble statue of the man would be. Thus it is that a passage through the flames or a fall from a high window-ledge would have had no terrors for the boy-helper, and that on...
Page 32 - ... well. But it will readily be seen that the amount of such help available must naturally be exceedingly limited. The more unselfish and helpful a person is, the less likely is he to be found after death lingering in full consciousness on the lower levels of the astral plane, from which the earth is most readily accessible. In...
Page 102 - ... work to make ourselves miserable about nothing. Surely we who are Theosophists ought, at any rate, to have got beyond this stage of irrational worry and causeless depression ; surely we, who are " trying to' acquire some definite knowledge of the cosmic order, ought by this time to have realized that the optimistic view of everything is always nearest to the divine view, and therefore to the truth, because only that in any person which is good and beautiful can by any possibility be permanent,...
Page 90 - The Path of Discipleship." retards their progress to higher spheres—and of enabling them as far as may be to comprehend the future that lies before them. Others who have been longer on the astral plane may also receive much help, if they will but accept it, from explanations and advice as to their course through its different stages. They may, for example, be warned of the danger and delay caused by attempting to communicate with the living through a medium, and sometimes (though rarely) an entity...
Page 115 - Who is the Gotrabhu?" Buddha says, "The man who is in possession of those conditions upon which the commencement of sanctification immediately ensues — he is the Gotrabhu." The wisdom necessary for the reception of the path of holiness is called Gotrabhu-gnana. Now that we have hastily glanced at the steps of the probationary period, we must emphasize the point to which reference was made at the commencement — that the perfect attainment of these accomplishments and qualifications is not expected...

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