The Home: Its Work and Influence

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Rowman Altamira, 2002 - Social Science - 347 pages
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Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Home is a scathing attack on the domesticity of women in the early 20th century. Her central argument, that 'the economic independence and specialization of women is essential to the improvement of marriage, motherhood, domestic industry, and racial improvement' resonates in this work. Throughout, she maintains that the liberation of women--and of children and of men, for that matter--requires getting women out of the house, both practically and ideologically. AltaMira Press is proud to reprint this provocative work and introduce Charlotte Perkins Gilman to a new generation of students and feminist scholars.

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Contents

INTRODUCTORY
3
THE EVOLUTION OF THE HOME
14
DOMESTIC MYTHOLOGY
36
PRESENT CONDITIONS
62
THE HOME AS A WORKSHOP
82
THE HOME AS A WORKSHOP II The Housemaid
104
HOMECOOKING
124
DOMESTIC ART
143
DOMESTIC ENTERTAINMENT
184
THE LADY OF THE HOUSE
206
THE CHILD AT HOME
230
THE GIRL AT HOME
252
HOME INFLUENCE ON MEN
272
HOME AND SOCIAL PROGRESS
300
LINES OF ADVANCE
323
RESULTS
339

DOMESTIC ETHICS
160

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Leaving home
Gill Jones
Snippet view - 1995
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About the author (2002)

Charlotte Perkins Gilman was a prolific American writer and feminist theorist who wrote over two hundred short stories, including 'The Yellow Wallpaper' (1892), a stark account of a young mother's mental breakdown. Michael S. Kimmel is Professor of Sociology at State University of New York, Stony Brook.

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