A Narrative of the Expedition to Algiers in the Year 1816: Under the Command of the Right Hon. Admiral Lord Viscount Exmouth

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J. Murray, 1819 - Algeria - 230 pages
 

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Page 35 - That will do ; fire, my fine fellows!" and I am sure, that before his Lordship had finished these words, our broadside was given, with great cheering, which was fired three times within five or six minutes ; and at the same instant the other ships did the same.
Page 18 - Vessels employed in the Mediterranean. In consideration of the deep interest manifested by his Royal Highness the Prince Regent of England for the termination of Christian slavery, his Highness the Dey of Algiers, in token of his sincere desire to maintain inviolable his friendly relations with Great Britain...
Page 52 - As England does not war for the destruction of cities, I am unwilling to visit your personal cruelties upon the inoffensive inhabitants of the country, and I therefore offer you the same terms of peace which I conveyed to you yesterday in my sovereign's name : without the acceptance of these terms you can have no peace with England. " If you receive this offer as you ought, you will fire three guns...
Page 48 - When I met his lordship on the poop, his voice was quite hoarse, and he had two slight wounds, one in the cheek, the other in the leg; and it was astonishing to see the coat of his lordship, how it was all cut up by musket-ball, and grape ; it was, indeed, as if a person had taken a pair of scissors, and cut it all to pieces.
Page 34 - ... the top of the parapets to look at us, for our broadside was higher than their batteries ; and they were quite surprised to see a three-decker, with the rest of the fleet, so close to them. From what I observed of the Captain of the Port's manner, and of their confusion inside of the mole...
Page 36 - The first fire was so terrible, that, they say, more than 500 persons were killed or wounded by it ; and I believe this, because there was a great crowd of people in every part, many of whom, after the first discharge, I saw running away, like dogs, walking upon their hands and feet.
Page 33 - Burgess, the flag-lieutenant, having agreed with me, we hoisted the signal, that " no answer had been given;" and began to row away towards the Queen Charlotte. At this time I was very anxious to get out of danger ; for, knowing their perfidious character, and observing that Lord Exmouth, . on his seeing our signal, immediately gave order to the fleet to bear up, and every...
Page 48 - I paid him my respects, he said to me, with his usual gracious and mild manner, ' Well, my fine fellow Salame, what think you now ? ' In reply I shook hands with his Lordship, and said...
Page 45 - ... particularly from this ship, (the Queen Charlotte,) the fire of which was kept up with equal fury, and never ceased, though his Lordship in several instances wished to cease firing for a short time, to make his observations, and it was with great difficulty that he could make the seamen stop for a few minutes. Several of the guns were so hot, that they could not use them again; some of them, being heated to such a degree, that when they fired them, they recoiled with their carriages and fixed...
Page 52 - I conveyed to you yesterday in my Sovereign's name : without the acceptance of these terms, you can have no peace with England. If you receive this offer as you ought, you will fire three guns, and I shall consider your not making this signal as a refusal, and shall renew my operations at my own convenience. I offer you the above terms, provided neither the British Consul, nor th...

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