Epinikoi Isthionikais

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Macmillan, 1892 - Aigina (Greece). - 194 pages
 

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Page xii - And love, and a space for delight, And beauty and length of days, And night, and sleep in the night. His speech is a burning fire; With his lips he travaileth; In his heart is a blind desire, In his eyes foreknowledge of death; He weaves, and is clothed with derision; Sows, and he shall not reap; His life is a watch or a vision Between a sleep and a sleep.
Page 192 - THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN GRADUATE LIBRARY DO NOT REMOVE OR MUTILATE CARD...
Page 35 - In the spring a fuller crimson comes upon the robin's breast; In the spring the wanton lapwing gets himself another crest; In the spring a livelier iris changes on the burnish'd dove; In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love.
Page 192 - TacitUS. — THE ANNALS. Edited, with Introductions and Notes, by GO HOLBROOKE, MA, Professor of Latin in Trinity College, Hartford, USA With Maps. 8vo.
Page 192 - AN INTRODUCTION TO ARISTOTLE'S RHETORIC. With Analysis, Notes, and Appendices. By EM COPE, Fellow and Tutor of Trinity College, Cambridge. 8vo. 14*.
Page 80 - a wine-cup rough with gold,' and Heracles prophesied the birth and the prowess of Ajax. Here then, is a case in which we can conceive that the poet's immediate theme may have occurred to his mind as he gazed on the sculptor's work in the splendid entablature of the temple ; and we...
Page 192 - HOMERIC STUDY, TOGETHER WITH AN ESSAY ON THE POINTS OF CoNTACT BETWEEN THE ASSYRIAN TABLETS AND THE HOMERIC TEXT. By the same Cr. 8vo.
Page viii - He now admitted in regard to the majority of these responsions that "they are invisible signals which the student discovers only by curious attention and which do not and are not meant to contribute to the artistic effect of the...
Page 140 - Teach us all so to number our days that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.
Page 104 - And grant that the fierce god of death, who now with no brazen shields, yet amid cries as of battle, wraps me in the flame of his onset, may turn his back in speedy flight from our land, borne by a fair wind to the great deep of Amphitrite, or to those waters in which none find haven, even to the Thracian wave; for if night leave aught undone, day follows to accomplish this.

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