The Rise and Rise of Road Transport, 1700-1990

Front Cover
Most books about Britain's transport history have concentrated on canals and railways. It is now clear that a great deal of traffic went by road even before turnpikes, and that goods as well as passenger services were much more highly developed than previously thought. Development of road transport continued during the Canal and Railway Ages and expanded with the advent of more efficient but more environmentally damaging motor vehicles. This book will be an essential book not only for transport specialists but also for genealogists, geographers, motor engineers, and those interested in technical change.
 

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Contents

Goods transport to the 1830s
8
Provincial carriers
14
Local carriers
16
Private carriers
18
Goods transport in towns
20
The essence of eighteenthcentury road transport
21
Change in the carrying trade
23
Droving
30
Horse tramways for all
48
Goods transport
49
The significant pedal cycle
52
by steam electricity or internal combustion?
53
The rapid mechanisation of passenger transport by road 190414
56
The more gradual mechanisation of goods transport by road
60
Motor transport between the wars
62
The growing importance of the motor bus
65

The significance of road transport
33
Passenger transport to the 1830s Greater change than in goods transport
35
Stage coach expansion explained
38
Other forms of passenger transport by road
41
Contribution to economic growth
42
Road transport in the railway age
43
Omnibuses and hackney carriages for the middle classes
46
The motorway age
68
The rise of private and the decline of public transport by road
71
Road transport more important than ever in the 1990s was always the most important transport mode
73
Notes
75
Bibliography
77
Index
83
Copyright

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Page ii - This series, specially commissioned by the Economic History Society, provides a guide to the current interpretations of the key themes of economic and social history in which advances have recently been made or in which there has been significant debate. In recent times economic and social history has been one of the most flourishing areas of historical study.
Page 2 - ... dots on the map, then gradually increasing in number and size so as to form continuous lines ; and only by the end of the century becoming, as John Holt somewhat optimistically declared in 1794, " so multiplied and extended as to form almost an universal plan of communication through the kingdom." 1 It took, in fact, practically a whole century of disconnected effort before even such national arteries of communication as the Great North Road from London to Edinburgh, the Irish road from London...
Page 5 - ... cost of equipment. What, then, were the probable facts as to the change that was caused by the canals? We have already adduced evidence in particular cases to show what was the outcome; and we have elsewhere brought together a still greater amount of testimony upon this subject1. Our conclusion is that the cost of canal carriage normally did not exceed one-half, and in most cases was from one-fourth to one-third, of the cost of land carriage.

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