A manual of Grecian antiquities

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Harper & brothers, 1852 - Greece - 437 pages
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Page 247 - the remains of a worship which preceded the rise of the Hellenic mythology and its attendant rites, grounded on a view of nature, less fanciful, more earnest, and better fitted to awaken both philosophical thought and religious feeling.
Page 366 - To effect this object, the oil was not simply spread over the surface of the body, but also well rubbed into the skin. The oil was mixed with fine African sand, several jars full of which were found in the baths of Titus, and one of these is now in the British Museum.
Page 247 - Valentinian, but he met with strong opposition, and they seem to have continued down to the time of the elder Theodosius. Respecting the secret doctrines which were revealed in them to the initiated, nothing certain is known. The general belief of the ancients was, that they opened to man a comforting prospect of a future state. But this feature does not seem to have been originally connected with these mysteries, and was probably added to them at the period which followed the opening of a regular...
Page 190 - Moreover, it was the province of the senate to receive zlcrayye\iai, or informations of extraordinary crimes committed against the state, and for which there was no special law provided. The senate in such cases either decided themselves, or referred the case to one of the courts of the heliaea, especially if they thought it required a higher penalty than it was competent for them to impose, viz., 500 drachmae.
Page 372 - . may have been used for enlarging wounds, &c., for which it would be particularly fitted by its blunt point and broad back. 8. A needle, about three inches long, made of iron. 9. An elevator (or instrument for raising depressed portions of the skull), made of iron, five inches long, and very much resembling those made use of in the present day.
Page 362 - ... latter necessarily ceased at a certain period of life, gymnastics continued to be cultivated by persons of all ages, though those of an advanced age naturally took lighter and less fatiguing exercises than boys and youths. The ancients, and more especially the Greeks, seem to have been...
Page 198 - When a person was p 2 173 condemned to death he was immediately given into the custody of the Eleven, who were then bound to carry the sentence into execution according to the laws.
Page 155 - ... and for life, was by degrees changed into a decennial, and finally into an annual office. When the last change took place, a further alteration was made by distributing the duties of the archon among nine magistrates, instead of giving them all to one.
Page 277 - the {пго(<е/лата were thick and broad ropes, which ran in a horizontal direction around the ship from the stern to the prow and were intended to keep the whole fabric together.
Page 417 - It seems to be generally admitted, that the chief object of this festival was to form a bond of union for the Grecian States. Besides this, the great importance which such an institution gave to the exercises . of the body. must have had an immense influence in forming the national character.

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