Poet in Exile: Ezra Pound

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Manchester University Press, 1964 - Poets, American - 273 pages
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Half a century after he first made his entry into the literary life of London, Ezra Pound is one of the best-known, yet least-known, of modern poets. The aim of this book is not to explain Pound's work, but to attempt to clarify certain definite aspects of it and to cut through the tangle of opinions, favourable and unfavourable, and the various irrlevancies, some stemming from Pound himself, which prevent many readers from getting at the best of it. The book is designed to present not only the poet who broke new ground and was, with Eliot, in the vanguard of the modern movement, but also the man, as critic of modern society, with his far-reaching and controversial theories on politics, economics and philosophy.
 

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Contents

Ezra Pound begins his Education
1
The Pagan Mystery Religions
15
London the Metropolis
29
The Norm of Language
42
Good Writing and the Health of Society
56
Central Judgements on Contemporary Literature
69
Words and Music
84
Some Dangers of Literary Biography
121
Pound and Politics
160
Economics
180
Pound as Historian
194
XFV An American Tradition
210
Confucius and Nineteenth Century Science
220
Conservation of the Better Tradition
229
The Cantos
241
Select Bibliography
261

Prose Style and Method of Thought
130
Sense of Responsibility
143

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