Major problems in American women's history: documents and essays

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Houghton Mifflin, 2007 - Social Science - 537 pages
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Designed to encourage critical thinking about history, theMajor Problemsseries introduces students to both primary sources and analytical essays on important topics in U.S. history.Major Problems in American Women's Historyis the leading reader for courses on the history of American women, covering the subject's entire chronological span. While attentive to the roles of women and the details of women's lives, the authors are especially concerned with issues of historical interpretation and historiography. The Fourth Edition features greater coverage of the experiences of women in the Midwest and the West, immigrant women, and more voices of women of color. Key pedagogical elements of theMajor Problemsformat have been retained: 14 to 15 chapters per volume, chapter introductions, headnotes, and suggested readings. New!In Chapter 1, an exclusive essay by Kate Haulman examines the evolution of the field of women's history and the state of women's history today. New!Chapter 2 now focuses on Native American women, while a new Chapter 3 covers witches and their accusers in New England and the Salem witch trials. New!Chapter 6 draws on recent scholarship on the roles of ordinary and elite women in the numerous reform movements of the Early Republic. Revised!Chapter 7 rethinks and refocuses the text's coverage of women's roles in slavery and the Civil War, and more directly addresses the lives of African American women during and after slavery. New!Post-1960 coverage (in Chapters 15–16) has been thoroughly revised to highlight the women's movement, women's health, recent immigration, and economic changes affecting women.

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
Gisela Bock Challenging Dichotomies in Womens History
8
Castaneda Women of Color and the Rewriting of Western
14
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About the author (2007)

Born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Mary Beth Norton received her B.A. from the University of Michigan (1964) and her Ph.D. from Harvard University (1969). She is the Mary Donlon Alger Professor of American History at Cornell University. Her dissertation won the Allan Nevins Prize. She has written THE BRITISH-AMERICANS (1972), LIBERTY?S DAUGHTERS (1980, 1996), Founding MOTHERS & FATHERS (1996), which was one of three finalists for the 1997 Pulitzer Prize in History, and IN THE DEVIL?S SNARE (2002), which was one of five finalists for the 2003 L.A. Times Book Prize in History and which won the English-Speaking Union's Ambassador Book Award in American Studies for 2003. She has co-edited three volumes on American women's history. She was also general editor of the AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION?S GUIDE TO HISTORICAL LITERATURE (1995). Her articles have appeared in such journals as the AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW, WILLIAM AND MARY QUARTERLY, and JOURNAL OF WOMEN?S HISTORY. Mary Beth has served as president of the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, as vice president for research of the American Historical Association, and as a presidential appointee to the National Council on the Humanities. She has appeared on Book TV, the History and Discovery Channels, PBS, and NBC as a commentator on Early American history, and she lectures frequently to high school teachers through the Teaching American History program. She has received four honorary degrees and in 1999 was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Guggenheim, Rockefeller, and Starr Foundations, and the Henry E. Huntington Library. In 2005?2006, she was the Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at the University of Cambridge and Newnham College.

Ruth M. Alexander (PhD, Cornell University) earned a BA at the City College of New York and an MA at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Since 1988 she has taught at Colorado State University, where she is currently Chair and Professor of History. A specialist in twentieth-century U.S. and American women's history, Dr. Alexander is the author of "The "Girl Problem": Female Sexual Delinquency in New York, 1900-1935"(1995). Her articles and essays have appeared several scholarly journals. In addition, Dr. Alexander has won research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Schlesinger Library, the New York State Library, and Colorado State University. She is a recipient of awards from the Western Association of Women Historians and the New York State Archives and Records Administration.

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