Hainteny: The Traditional Poetry of Madagascar

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Leonard Fox
Bucknell University Press, 1990 - Literary Criticism - 464 pages
2 Reviews
This book is the first translation into English of a large, representative collection of the quintessential form of Malagasy poetic creativity. In addition, it is the largest assemblage of hainteny texts ever published in one volume.
 

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Contents

The Course of Love
87
Desire Hesitation Declaration
89
Consent and Union
111
Refusal
135
Rivals
149
Separation and Abandonment
169
Regrets Reproaches and Indifference
211
The Course of Life
255
Mockery and Humor
335
Prayers and Imprecations
357
War
367
Death
373
Variants
381
Notes to the Poems
405
Glossary
433
The Textual History of Hainteny
437

Good and Evil
257
Wisdom and Foolishness
269
Parents and Children
295
Poverty and Wealth
309
Pride
317

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Page 57 - Song CANTO I Leaf of lehua and noni-tint, the Kona sea, Iridescent saffron and red, Changeable watered red, peculiar to Kona; Red are the uplands Alaea; 5 Ah, 'tis the flame-red stained robes of women Much tossed by caress or desire. The weed-tangled water-way shines like a rope of pearls, Dew-pearls that
Page 57 - The hair of the trees, their long locks— 10 Lo, they wilt in the heat of Kailua the deep. A mat spread out narrow and gray, A coigne of land by the sea where the fisher drops hook. Now looms the mount Kilohana—
Page 57 - Mele PALE I Lau lehua punoni ula ke kai o Kona, Ke kai punoni ula i oweo ia; Wewena ula ke kai la, he kokona; Ula ia kini i ka uka o Alaea, 5 I hili ahi ula i ke kapa a ka wahine, I hoeu
Page 78 - There is, therefore, a positive value in obscurity which must be affirmed, in opposition to those who expect poetry to be as plain as a pikestaff
Page 81 - Richard Winstedt, A History of Classical Malay Literature (Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press, 1969), p.
Page 58 - The intricately twisted language of this mele is allegorical, a rope whose strands are inwrought with passion, envy, detraction, and abuse. In translating it one has to choose
Page 78 - Light seems to be involved: a visual perception. But not a visual perception of the image alone; rather an intuition of a presence: in Hobbes's phrase, a sudden glory. Actually I believe the sensation has to do with the immediate obscurity of the verse, and is strictly parallel to the pleasure I derive from obscurity in English poetry.
Page 71 - salue le soir. Paroles pour chant, dis-tu, paroles pour chant, paroles pour chant, pour désigner le frêle écho du chant intérieur qui s'amplifie et retentit, tentant de charmer le silence du livre et les landes de la mémoire, ou les rives désertes des lèvres et l'angoisse des
Page 56 - The double meaning in a Hawaiian mele will not always be evident to one whose acquaintance with the language is not intimate.

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