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Excerpt from minute of meeting of the form council of the royal burgh of Antlrutker Easter, in the county of Fife, North Britain, dated 5th May, 18G5. Inter aha, on the motion of the provost, the council unanimously agreed to record their abhorrence and detestation of the assassination of the President of the United States, and their sympathy and condolence with the Americans under the great loss which they had sustained, aud requested the provost to forward an excerpt from this minute to Mr. Adams, the American minister in London.

Extracted by—

MAB. F. CONOLLT, Clerk.

To his excellency the honorable Charles Francis Adams, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary for the United States of America: .

We, the provost, magistrates, and town council of the royal burgh of Ayr, in council assembled, beg to express to you, as the representative in this country of the government and people of the United States of America, our utter abhorrence of the atrocity whereby that great people has been deprived of the services of their Chief Magistrate, who, after years of a most terrific struggle, approved himself to his countrymen by his patriotism, honesty of purpose, and great integrity, who had the fullest confidence of that great nation during the most critical period of its history, whose unwearied patience and perseverance under circumstances of trial, of difficulty, and of defeat, were only matched by his moderation evinced in the hour of success, and whose magnanimity and forbearance made an impression here that Abraham Lincoln was a great and good man.

We also desiie to express our heartfelt sympathy and condolence with the government and people of the United States who have been so suddenly deprived of their chief magistrate at a momentous crisis in the history of their country.

Signed in name aud by authority of the magistrates and council by me, provost of Ayr.

J. MAO NEILLE.

To Ait excellency the honorable Charles Francis Adams, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary for the United States of America.

We, the provost, magistrates, and town council of the royal burgh of Arbroath, beg to convey to you, as the representative in this country of the government and people of the United States of America, that expression of the feelings of profound sorrow and indignation with which we received the melancholy intelligence of the assassination of the President of the United States. We deeply sympathize with the government and people of the United States in the loss they have sustained by the death, so much to be deplored, of their late President, who was so well fitted by his character and the confidence reposed in him to heal those divisions by which his country had been torn asunder.

We join in expressing our best wishes for the welfare of the United States, and the hope that the termination of the war will enable them to make that rapid progress for which their country presents so great advantages.

Signed in name aud by appointment of the magistrates and town council of r -I Arbroath, and the common seal of the said burgh affixed hereto, on Iseal.j Thursday, the 2oth day of May, eighteen hundred and sixty-five.

JOHN LUMGAIR,
Provost and Vhief Magistrate of Arbroath.

At a meeting of the town council of the borough of Ashton-under-Lyne, in the county of Lancaster, held on Wednesday, the 10th day of May, 1865, John Gait, esquire, mayor, in the chair, it was moved hy Mr. Alderman Mason, seconded by Mr. Councillor Wood, and resolved as follows:

The mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the borough of Ashton-under-Lyne, in council assembled, having heard with profound grief of the brutal and cowardly assassination of Mr. Abraham Lincoln, the President of the United States of America, hereby record their feelings of horror and detestation at the malignity and treachery of the act which has deprived that great country of its Chief Magistrate; and express their heartfelt sympathy with the people of that country in their time of all-absorbing sorrow.

This council beg to offer their tribute of reverence for the memory of a great American whose ripened experience and humane nature pre eminently fitted him to reconcile the animosities of a divided people, and heal the wounds of a distracted nation.

This council fervently trust that the magnanimous policy of the late President may continue to guide the American people, that war and bloodshed may come to a speedy end, and that peace, prosperity, and happiness may again prevail.

This council also respectfully offer to Mrs. Lincoln their genuine affection and sympathy for her irreparable loss, and trust she may find sweet consolation iu witnessing the grand results of the wise, unselfish, and patriotic career of her martyred husband. /

Tlie corporate seal was affixed in the presence of—

JOHN GALT, Mayor, [seal.]
WILLIAM MARSHALL, Town Clerk.

Resolutions passed at a meeting held by the Temperance Society of Ashton-underLyne.

Ashton-under-lyne, May 10, 1865.

The president, vice-president, officers, and members of the Ashton-underLyne Temperance Society, in meeting assembled, have heard with profound grief of the brutal and cowardly assassination of Mr. Abraham Lincoln, the President of the United States of America, and hereby record their feelings of horror and detestation at the malignity and treachery of the act which has deprived that great country of its Chief Magistrate, and express their heartfelt sympathy with the people of that country iu their time of all-absorbing sorrow.

This meeting beg to offer their tribute of reverence lor the memory of a great ruler, whose ripened experience and humanity pre-eminently fitted to reconcile the animosities of a divided people and heal the wounds of a distracted nation. This meeting feel all the more earnest in their attachment to Mr. Abraham Lincoln because he had for more than fifty years adopted and carried out those great principles of temperance and total abstinence (from all intoxicating drinks) for which we are contending. That, whether he enjoyed the privacy of home, or sustained the dignities of a palace; that, whether he'performed the duties of a citizen, or the more difficult duties of governing a great nation, he had the wisdom to see, and the moral courage to adopt, the great principles of temperance, truth, and progress.

This meeting also respectfully offer to Mrs. Lincoln and family their genuine affection and sympathy for their irreparable loss, and trust they may find sweet consolation in witnessing the grand results of the wise, unselfish, and patriotic 'career of their martyred husband and father.

Signed on behalf of the committee and society by

MARTIN PARKINSON, President.
EDWIN WILLIAMSON, Virc-Presidtnt.

His Excellency Andrew Johnson,

President of the United States of America,

and through him to Mrs Lincoln.

Address nf the Union and Emancipation Society of Ashton-undcr-Lyne to Mrs.

Lincoln.

A.shton-under-lyne Union And Emancipation Society,

May 26, 1865.

The sorrowful intelligence which has been recently transmitted to us, announcing the death of your much-beloved husband, Abraham Lincoln, has filled our hejut.'* with pain and sadness. We little expected that his valuable life would have been so suddenly destroyed by the treacherous hand of a cowardly assassin, and cannot but lament the irreparable loss which has deprived you of a faithful protector, your children of an affectionate father, and the American people of a thoughtful and sagacious statesman.

We consider the death of the late President a world-wide calamity, because the impression made by it seems to be the strongest and most general that has ever appeared upon the death of a fellow-man; and it is for this reason that we desire to convey to you our united expressions of grief in this severe trial of your affliction and bereavement, and also to declare our abhorrence of the brutal and horrible crime by which his life was sacrificed.

In contemplating his character we have often felt a just admiration which his many virtues command; but to dwell upon them here, in any particular, is unnecessary, and, upon this occasion, would perhaps be improper. That bis loss has been generally lamented cannot be wondered at, for certainly there never was a more just cause for universal sorrow. To lose such a man, at such a critical time, so unexpectedly and so barbarously, must add to every feeling of regret, and make the sense of bereavement more severe and acute to all thinking minds. He was snatched away in the midst of a crisis when America could spare him least; at a time when the people hoped to be especially benefited by his energy, bis benevolence, and his wisdom. His ardent desire to promote the welfare of his fellow-men was conspicuously the animating motive of his active life His indefatigable labors to strike off the fetters which have so long board the down-trodden negro have at length been rewarded by a glorious and triumphant victory. Millions of them are already free—free as the very breath of heaven; and the accursed slave-stain, which has ever soiled the American banner, will now be eradicated, and the fate of the accursed system forever sealed with the martyred blood of a holy Christian man. Never was he known to shirk the onerous duties of his responsible office; in every instance we have found him true to his sacred oath; even in the latest hours of his life kindness to his enemies was the uppermost sentiment of his generous heart, prompting the most considerate arrangements for the happiness and comfort of a great and mighty people.

In conclusion, permit us to hope that the humble and genuine affection so widely entertained towards him will tend to mitigate in some degree the heavy bereavement of his afflicted family, consoling them with the knowledge that the labors of the departed are truly appreciated by thousands of earnest hearts in far distant lands.

Signed on behalf of the members of the Ashton-under-Lyne Union and Emancipation Society.

JAMES BROADBENT, President.
JOHN HAGUE, Vice-President.
JOHN GLAZEBROOK, Treasurer.
JOB ARUNDALE, Secretary.

Mrs. Lincoln.

Resolution of the Anglesey Baptist Association of Beaumaris.

Holyhead, June 14, 18G5.

At the above association, held at the county town Beaumaris, ou the 30th and 31st ultimo, it was

Unanimously resolved, That this association desires to express the deepest regret at the irreparable loss which has befallen the people of the United States by the untimely death of President Lincoln; and in sincere condolence with Mrs. Lincoln on the sad event; also to congratulate our Christian brethren in America ou the triumph of negro emancipation.

JOHN LEWIS,

Chairman of the Association.

JOHN PALMER, Secretary of the Association.

His Excellency Mr. Adams,

Ambassador of the Un ited States, London.

Motion of a meeting held in Bolton, on 27th April, 1865.

Moved by Alderman Furguson, seconded by Mr. Itigby, and carried unanimously—

That this meeting do hereby express their strongest feelings of abhorrence and grief at the atrociotis assassination of the Presideut of the United States, and the dastardly attempt upou the life of Mr. Seward.

Also their deep sorrow and heartfelt sympathy with Mrs. Lincoln and family.

That the chairman be requested to forward the same to the American minister.

BOROUGH OF BOLTON, COUNTY OF LANCASTER, ENGLAND.

Copy of resolution of the council of the said borough, unanimously passed at a meeting thereof held on the 10<A day of May, 1865.

Resolved, That this council regards with intense horror and detestation the diabolical assassination of President Lincoln, the twice elected Chief Magistrate of the United States ; and hereby records its heartfelt sympathy with his widow and Countrymen, in their mourning for his loss and untimely end, hoping that their Borrow may speedily be assuaged by the return of national peace and prosperity.

Resolution of the council of Brechin.

At Brechin, and within the council chambers there, on the tenth day of May, eighteen hundred and sixty-five.

In a meeting of the council of said city, the following resolution, moved by Alexander Guthrie, esquire, provost, was unanimously agreed to:

The magistrates and councillors of the city of Brechin, in the county of Forfar, Scotland, having heard with feelings of sorrow and indignation of the cowardly assassination of President Lincoln, resolve to express their abhorrence and detestation of the cold-blooded and murderous deed, and their cordial sympathy with the people of the United States, on being thus deprived of one who, by his honesty of purpose and patriotism, as well as steadfast adherence to what he considered the principles of right and justice, has left hehind him a name that will long be remembered; and the council further resolve, that a copy of this resolution, signed by the provost, and having the seal of the city affixed, be transmitted to his excellency Mr. Adams, the United States minister in London. r„„ i " ALEXANDER GUTHRIE,

ISbAL.J Tj

'1 rrorost.

AVe, the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the borough of Berwick-uponTweed, in council assembled, in uuisou with all classes of her Majesty's subjects, beg to add our expression of horror and indignation at the unparalleled crime which has deprived the United States of America of their admirable President, and of our deep and sincere sympathy with the sorrow of that great people, caused by an act of such atrocity.

Given under the common seal of the borough, at our quarterly meeting, on the 3d day of May, 1S65.

[sevl ] Sealed in open council this 3d day of May, 1865.

At a meeting of the town council of the borough of Burnley, held at the council-room, Burnley, on the 3d day of May, 1865—the mayor presiding—

Rstolred unanimously, (on motion of Mr. Alderman Coultake, seconded by Mr. Alderman Massey,) That this meeting, as representing the inhabitants of Burnley, desires to express its profound sympathy with the people of the United States of America, at the irreparable loss sustained by them through the death, by assassination, of their President, Abraham Lincoln; and to record its abhorrence of the infamous crime which has excited so much horror, as well in this country as throughout the United States; and that a copy of this resolution, signed by the town clerk, be forwarded to Mr. Adams, the American minister in London. t

I certify the above to be a true copy.

r , A. B. CREEKE,

|SEAL-J Tmm Clerk.

At a meeting of the town council of the royal burgh of Burntisland, Scotland, held on the 2d day of May, 1865, the following resolution was unanimously agreed to, and the provost was requested to forward a copy of the same to his excellency thf honorable Charles Francis Adams, United States minister:

The provost magistrates and town council of the royal burgh of Burntisland, in their own name, and in that of the community whose interests thej' represent, beg, most respectfully, to offer to the people of America their expressions of deep sympathy and condolence on the occasion of the lamented death of the late able, high-minded, and enlightened President of the United States, and desire at the same time to record their strong feelings of abhorrence and detestation of the crime by means of which the death of the President of the United States was accomplished.

[seal.j 0. K. SWAIRIGHT,

Provost of Burntisland.

BoRoroH Of Barnstaple, in the County of Devon, to wit:

At a quarterly meeting of the town council of this borough, held on the 10th day of May, 1865, it was

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