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up and down Broadway I saw old and prosperous friends coming, but before I came anywhere near them, if they espied me they would dodge into a store, or across the street, or opportunely meet some one with whom they had pressing business, or they would be very much interested in something that was going on over the way or on top of the City Hall. I was delighted at this, for it gave me at once a new sensation and a new experience. "Ah, ha!" I suid to myself; "my butterfly friends, I know you now; and what is more to the point, if ever I get out of this bewilderment of broken clock-wheels, I shall not forget you "; and I heartily thanked the old clock concern for giving me the opportunity to learn this sad but most needful lesson. I had a very few of the same sort of experiences in Bridgeport, and they proved valuable to me.

Mr. James D. Johnson, of Bridgeport, one of my assignees, who had written to me that my personal presence might facilitate a settlement of my affairs, told me soon after my arrival that there was no probability of disposing of Iranistan at present, and that I might as well move my family into the house. I had arrived in August and my family followed me from London in September, and October 20. 1857, my second daughter, Helen, was married in the house of her elder sister, Mrs. D. W. Thompson, in Bridgeport, to Mr. Samuel H. Hurd.

Meanwhile, Iranistan which had been closed and unoccupied for more than two years, was once more opened to the carpenters and painters whom Mr. Johnson sent there to put the house in order. He agreed with me that it was best to keep the property as long as possible, and in the interval, till a purchaser for the estate appeared, or till it was forced to auction, to take up the clock notes whenever they were offered. The workmen who weYe employed in the house were specially instructed not to smoke there, but nevertheless it was subsequently discovered that some of the men were in the habit occasionally of going into the main dome to eat their dinners which they brought with them, and that they stayed there awhile after dinner to smoke their pipes.- In all probability, one of these lighted pipes was left on the cushion which covered the circular seat in the dome and ignited the tow with which the cushion was stuffed. It may have been days and even weeks before this smouldering tow fire burst into flame.

I was staying at the Astor House, in New York, when, on the morning of December 18, 1857, I received a telegram from my brother Philo F. Barnum, dated at Bridgeport and informing me that Iranistan was burned to the ground that morning, The alarm was given at eleven o'clock on the night of the 17th, and the fire burned till one o'clock on the morning of the 18th. My beautiful Iranistan. was gone! This was not only a serious loss to my estate, for it had probably cost at least $150,000, but it was generally regarded as a public calamity. It was the only building in its peculiar style of architecture, of any pretension, in America, and many persons visited Bridgeport every year expressly to see Iranistan. The insurance on the mansion had usually been about $62,000, but I had let some of the policies expire without renewing them, so that at the time of the fire there was only $28,000 insurance on the property. Most of the furniture and pictures were saved, generally in a damaged state.

Subsequently, my assignees sold the grounds and ouk houses of Iranistan to the late Eliaa Howe, Jr., the eel

ebrated inventor of the needle for sewii The property brought $50,000, which, with the $28,C insurance, went into my assets to satisfy clock creditors, It was Mr. Howe's intention to erect a splendid mansion on the estate, but his untimely and lamented death prevented the fulfilment of the plan. The estate (in '1869 > was to be divided among Mr. Howe's three children and in all probability three houses will be built upon the beautiful grounds. '> , , , . ,(

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CHAPTER XXXI.

THE ART OF MONEY GETTING.

BACK ONCE MORE TO ENGLAND — TOUlt THROUGH SCOTLAND AND WALES — HOW I CAME TO LECTURE—ADVICE OF MY FRIENDS—MY LECTURE — HOW TO MAKE MONEY AND HOW TO KEEP IT — WHAT THE PAPERS SAH> ABOUT ME — PRAISE OF TOE LONDON PRESS—LECTURING IN THE PROVINCES — PERFORMANCES AT CAMBRIDGE — CALL FOR JOICE HETII — EXTRAORDINARY FUN AT OXFORD

— THE AUDIENCE AND LECTURER TAKING TURNS—A UNIVERSITY BREAKFAST— MAGNTFICENT OFFER FOR A COPYRIGHT — SUCCESS OF MY ENTERPRISE

— MORE MONEY FOR THE CLOCK CREDITORS.

Seeing the necessity of mating more money to assist in extricating me from my financial difficulties, and leaving my affairs in the hands of Mr. James D. Johnson — my wife, and youngest daughter, Pauline, boarding with my eldest daughter, Mrs. Thompson, in Bridgeport — early in 1858, I went hack to England, and took Tom Thumb to all the principal places in Scotland and Wales, giving many exhibitions and making much money which was remitted, as heretofore, to my agents and assignees in America.

Finding, after a while, that my personal attention was not needed in the Tom Thumb exhibitions and confiding him almost wholly to agents who continued the tour through Great Britain, under my general advice and instruction, 1 turned my individual attention to a new field. At the suggestion of several American gentlemen, resident in London, I prepared a lecture on "The Art of Money-Getting." I told my friends that, considering my clock complications, t thought I was more competent to speak on " The Art of Money Losing "; but they encouraged me by reminding me that I could not have lost money, if I had not previously possessed the faculty of making it They further assured me that my name having been intimately associated with the ,.JfennyLind concerts and other great money-making enterprises, the lecture would be sure to prove attractive and profitable.

The old clocks ticked in mv ear the reminder that I should improve every opportunity to "turn an honest penny," and my lecture was duly announced for delivery in the great St. James' Hall, Regent Street, Piccadilly. It was thoroughly advertised — a feature I never neglected — and, at the appointed time, the hall, which would hold three thousand people, was completely filled, at prices of three and two shillings, (seventy-five and fifty cents,) per seat, according to location. It was the evening of December 29, 180B. Since my arrival in Great Britain,the,previous spring, I had spent months in travelling with General Tom Thumb, and now I was to present myself in a new capacity to the English public as a lecturer. I could see in mv audience all my American friends who had suggested this effort; all my theatrical and literary friends ; and as I saw several gentlemen whom I knew to be, connected with the leading London papers, I felt sure that my success or .failure would be duly chronicled next morning. There was, moreover, a general audience that seemed eager to see the " showman " of whom they had heard so much, and to catch from his lips the " art" which, in times past, had contributed so largely to his success in life. Stimulated by these things, lj tried,to do pry best, and I think I-did it. The following is the lecture substantially^, §©

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