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interested in bringing about closer relations between the United States and her sister republics.

It is now proposed, therefore, that there be organized, with headquarters in New York City, the Pan American Society of the United States, whose object shall be (to paraphrase the purpose of The Pilgrims) "the promotion of the sentiment of brotherhood" among the American nations, and "especially the cultivation of good fellowship" between citizens of the United States and those of its sister American Republics. It has been suggested that all men interested in bringing about a better acquaintance among the peoples of Pan America should be invited to join and that its honorary members should include the Presidents of the American Republics and the ambassadors and ministers of the LatinAmerican countries in Washington. It is also believed that there could be no more fitting choice for the first president of the Pan American Society than Elihu Root.

The other project involves the holding in Washington, some time in February, in the Hall of the Republics of the new building of the Pan American Union, a gathering of the representatives of chambers of commerce, boards of trade, general commercial organizations, and interested manufacturing, exporting, and importing firms to hear and discuss the conditions of trade exchange among the American countries. This conference will probably last one week and will be addressed by ministers and consuls of the United States who are home on leave of absence from Latin America, by ministers and consuls in this country of the Latin American countries, and by both official and private trade experts. These discussions will be along practical lines and will be illustrated and amplified by maps, charts, and photographs. The conference will have no political bearing whatever and no resolutions will be presented or discussed favoring this or that partisan policy.

The chief purpose, in short, will be to provide, under the auspices of the Pan American Union, and with the patronage of the United States and the other American Republics which compose the Union, a useful educational session and symposium, as it were, covering thoroughly the various phases and conditionsof Pan American trade. It is hoped that the responsible commercial organizations of the United States and the larger manufacturing, exporting, and importing houses will respond favorably to the invitations to this conference which will be sent out early in November, and the Director General has reason to believe, from informal correspondence which he has already had, that there will be wide interest in this effort to awaken the country generally to the importance of Pan American commerce. It is believed that each representative of a commercial organization or business firm who attends this conference will receive in one week a practical education which he could not gain in any other way in many months of study or travel and that he will be able to

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RECEPTION TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES ABOARD THE ARGENTINE TRAINING SHIP "PRESIDENTE SARMIENTO" AT WASHINGTON NAVY YARD. OCTOBER 25, 1910. Upper picture: Officers of the " Prcsldonte Sarmiento."

Corner picture: On the right of President Taft is Sefiora Dona Helena Hamilton do Villegas. wifeof the Charge1 d'Affaires of the Argentine Republic at Washington; on the left, in the order named, arc Sefior Don Jacinto L. Villegas. Mrs Taft. Admiral Domecq Garcia, of the Argentine Navy, Philander C. Knox, Secretary of State of the United Stales. Commander Enrique G. Flless, of the " Presidente Sarmiento," and Sefior Don Francisco Leon de la Barra. Mexican Ambassador to the United States.

Lower picture: Midshipmen of the " Presldenle Sarmiento."

return to his respective city or company and use the information acquired with great benefit to those interested.

Both of these projects have the informal indorsement of the officials of the United States State Department, of Senator Euhu Root, and of Hon. Henry White, Chairman of the United States Delegation to the Pan American Conference.

THE NEW NAME, "THE PAN AMERICAN UNION."

The action of the Pan American Conference at Buenos Aires in changing the name of "The International Bureau of American Republics" to "The Pan American Union" has been favorably received on all sides. The latter term is so short and expressive that it can be carried readily in mind and correctly used. The former title was so very seldom quoted in its exact form and was so long and cumbersome that the average person would hesitate, as he endeavored to describe the institution, in his efforts to give it its actual name. The most common error was to call it "The Bureau of South American Republics"—a term which is entirely wrong. The institution is All-American, for it includes the Republics of North America as well as those of South America. In fact, a majority of the nations supporting the Pan American Union are located north of South America. Twenty-one independent Republics belong to the Union, of which 11 are located in North America or nearer to it than to South America. The term " North America" includes every country from Panama north, together with the island republics of Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Haiti.

THE INTERNATIONAL PRISON CONGRESS.

The Pan American Union had an opportunity recently of extending hospitality to the International Prison Congress, which was held in Washington. The committee had planned to hold their meetings in the hall of the new National Museum, but as this could not be made ready in time, an appeal was made to the Union for the use of the Hall of the American Republics. Permission was granted [because of the international character of this Congress and of the fact that, included among its delegates, were representatives of many Latin' American countries. It was gratifying to hear the expressions of appreciation of the beautiful building of the Pan American Union which were recorded by the delegates from the foreign countries. Many of them were good enough to say that they regarded it as one of the most beautiful and significant public buildings in the world.

The Director General has received a letter from Mr. Charles R. Henderson, President of the Eighth International Prison Congress,

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REPRESENTATIVES FROM LATIN-AMERICAN REPUBLICS ATTENDING THE INTERNATIONAL PRISON CONGRESS HELD IN THE PAN AMERICAN BUILDING, WASHINGTON, D. C, OCTOBER 2-8, 1910.

Gen. Demetrio del Castillo, Superintendent National Penitentiary, Havana.Cuba. Senor Dr. Don Armando Claros. Director National Penitentiary, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Sr. Dr. Don Esteban Gil-Borges, First Secretary of Venezuelan Legation, Washington, D. C.

Sr. Don Francisco de P. Borda,
Minister of Colombia, Wash-
ington. D. C. Sr. Dr. Don
Rafael M. Arizaga, Minister
of Ecuador,Washington, D. C.

Judge R. Lancis, President Criminal Court, Havana, Cuba. Sr. Lie. Don Ismael Pizarro Suarez, Secretary Prison Board, Mexico City, Mexico. Sr. Lie. Don Guillermo Moncada, Hondurean Consul-General, New York City.

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