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A FACSIMILE, BY PHOTOLITHOGRAPHY, FROM THE UNIQUE ORIGINAL IN

THE CAPELL COLLECTION AT TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE,

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LONDON:
PRODUCED BY C. PRAETORIUS, 14 CLAREVILLE GROVE,

HEREFORD SQUARE, S.W.

1888.

1

43 SHAKSPERE QUARTO FACSIMILES, WITH INTRODUCTIONS, LINE-NUMBERS, &c., BY SHAKSPERE SCHOLARS, ISSUED UNDER THE SUPERINTENDENCE OF DR. F. J. FURNIVALL.

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1. Those by W. Griggs. No.

No. 1. Hamlet. 1603, Q1.

8. Henry IV. 1st Part. 1598. Qı. 2. Hamlet. 1604. Q2.

9. Henry IV. 2nd Part. 1600. 3. Midsummer Night's Dream. 1690. Qi: 10. Passionate Pilgrim. 1599. Q1. (Fisher.)

11. Richard III. 1597. Qi. 4. Midsummer Night's Dream. 1600. Q2. 12. Venus and Adonis. 1593. Q1 (Roberts.)

13. Troilus and Cressida. 1609. Qi. 5. Loves Labor's Lost. 1598. Qı.

17. Richard II. 1597. Qi. Duke of Devon6. Merry Wives. 1602. Q1.

shire's copy. (Best version : text printed.) 7. Merchant of Venice. 1600. Q1. (Roberts.)

2. Those by C. Praetorius. 14. Much Ado About Nothing. 1600.

31. Othello. 1622. Q1. 15. Taming of a Shrew. 1594.

32. Othello. 1630. Q2. 16. Merchant of Venice. 1600. Q2. (Heyes.) 33. King Lear. 1608. Qi. (N. Butter, Pide 18. Richard II. 1597. Q1. Mr. Huth's copy.

Bull.) 19. Richard II. 1608. 03.

34. King Lear. 1608. Q2. (N. Butter.) 20. Richard II. 1634. 25.

35. Rape of Lucrece. 1594. Qr. 21. Pericles. 1609. Qi.

56. Romeo and Juliet. Undated. Q4. 22. Pericles. 1609. Q2.

37. Contention. 1594. Qi. (For 2 Henry VI.) 23. The Whole Contention. 1619. Q3. Part I. 38. True Tragedy. 1595. Qi. (For 3 Henry (for 2 Henry VI.).

VI.) 24. The Whole Contention. 1619. Q3. Part II. 39. The Famous Victories of Henry V. 1598. (for 3 Henry VI.).

Q1. 25. Romeo and Juliet. 1597. Q1.

40. The Troublesome Raigne of King John. 26. Romeo and Juliet. 1599. Q2.

Part I. 1591. QI. 27. Henry V. 1600. Qi.

41. The Troublesome Raigne of King John. 28. Henry V. 1608. Q2.

Part II, 1591. Q1. 29. Titus Andronicus. 1600. QI.

42. Richard III. 1602. 03. 30. Sonnets and Lover's Complaint. 1509. Qi. 43. Richard III. 1622. Qo. ion stone.)

Q1.

[Shakspere-Quarto Facsimiles, No. 41.)

iii

TROUBLESOME RAIGNE, PART II.

FOREWORDS.

Sources of PART I.

SOURCES OF PART II.

Sc. i. Death and Character of Richard I, Sc. i. Arthur's death, p. xvii.

p. iii ; First strife between John and Sc. ii. The Prophet, p. xviii; Q.
Arthur, p. iv; The Falconbridge in- Eleanor's death, p. xix; John's sub-
ciilent, p. vii; Falconbridge possibly mission to the Pope, p. xxiv.
taken in part from Falco de Brenta Sc. iii. Conspiracy of the Nobles, p. xxi.
or Breauté, p. xxxix.

Sc. iv. Pandulph, John and Lewes, p. xxv.
Sc. ii, iv. Angiers, and the Betrothal of Sc.iv. 73-6, Sc. viii. 94-7. John's ill hap
Lewes and Blanche, p. viii.

since he submitted to the Pope, p. xx. Sc. iii, vi. Bastard and Limoges, p. x. Sc. v. Melun's Confession of Lewes's Sc. v. Pandulph, John, and the Inter- Treachery, p. xxix.

dict, p. x; John's Headship of the Sc. vi, viii. John at Swinstead, p. xxx ; Church, p. xiii.

His ill hap, p. xx; His Death, p. xxx. Sc. vii—ix. Capture of Q. Eleanor, p. Sc. vii. The French forces, p. xxxiii. xiv; of Arthur, p. xv.

Sc. ix. The Treaty of Peace, p. XXXV;
Sc. x. The Prophet, p. xviii.

John's Burial at Worcester, p. xxxii.
Sc. xi. Arthur and Hubert, p. xvi.
Sc. xii. The 5 Moons (p. xviii); John's Merits of the old Play, p. xxxvii.

recrowning, p. xvi ; the Prophet, p. Corrections for pages 34-9, p. xxxviii:
xviii.

Falconbridge, p. xxxix.

The Persons of th: Play, p. xl. This Troublesome Raigne was Shakspere's material for his King John, and in the Forewords to Part I, Mr. Rose showd how skilfully (in the main) our Poet used that material, though he faild to make of it a good acting play. With the help of my friend Mr. W. G. Stone, I propose now to give what was probably the old Playwright's material, those parts of Holinshed's and Hall's Chronicles (Holinshed, ed. 2, 1586-7, vol. iii.) which he used, with a few words linking them together.

The old Playwright starts his first Part with the death of John's elder brother, Richard, Victorious scourge of Infidels,' the LionHeart of England, and with the sorrow of the land in consequence. On this, and the quality which may have led to the insertion of the Lady Falconbridge incident, Holinshed says:

(156. i. 46) 'At length king Richard [1] by force of A.D. 1199. sicknesse (increased with anguish of his incurable wound) departed this life, on the tuesdaie before Palmesundaie, King being the ninth of Aprill, and the xj. day after he was hurt, departed this in the yeare after the birth of our Sauior 1199. in the 44 yeare of his age, and after he had reigned nine yeares, nine moneths, and od daies : he lest no issue behind him.

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life.

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iv

PT. I. SC. I.

RICH. I'S CHARACTER.

JOHN AND ARTHUR IN FRANCE.

His stature
& shape of
bodie.
His disposi-
tion of mind.

6

The vices that were in King Richard.

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He was tall of stature, and well proportioned, faire and comelie of face .

• As he was comelie of personage, so was he of stomach more couragious and fierce, so that not without cause, he obteined the surname of Cueur de lion, that is to saie, The lions hart. Moreouer, he was courteous to his souldiers, and towards his freends and strangers that resorted vnto him verie liberall

[Col. 2] 'He was noted of the common people to be partlie subiect vnto pride, which surelie for the most part foloweth stoutnesse of mind : of incontinencie, to the which his youth might happilie be somewhat bent; and of couetousnesse .. On a time whiles he soiourned

in France about his warres .. there came ynto him a Fulco a

French priest whose name was Fulco, who required the priest.

K[ing] in any wise to put from him three abhominable daughters which he had ...“for thou hast three daughters, one of them is called pride, the second couetousnessé,

and the third lecherie Next succeeds King John, the 'second hope' of Queen Elinor's womb (Sc. i. 1. 6); and at once the strife between him (then in France) and Arthur begins (Hol. iii., p. 157, col. 1) = Anno Reg. 1. “This man, so soone as his brother Richard was

deceassed, sent Hubert archbishop of Canturburie, and Rog. Houed. William Marshall earle of Striguill (otherwise called Chep

stow) into England, both to proclaime him king, and also to see his peace kept, togither with Geffrey Fitz Peter lord cheefe iustice, and diuerse other barons of the realme, whilest he himselfe went to Chinon where his brothers trea

sure laie, which was foorthwith deliuered vnto him by Robert de Robert de Turneham: and therewithall the castell of

Chinon and Sawmer and diuerse other places, which were in the custodie of the foresaid Robert.

But Thomas de Furnes, nephue to the said Robert de (Angiers Turneham, deliuered the citie and castell of Angiers vnto given up to Arthur.]

Arthur duke of Britaine. For by generall consent of the nobles and peeres of the countries of Aniou, Maine, and Touraine, Arthur was receiued as the liege and souereigne lord of the same countries.

'For euen at this present, and so soone as it was knowne that king Richard was deceased, diuerse cities and townes on that side of the sea belonging to the said Richard

whilest he liued, fell at ods among themselues, some of [Arthur pre- them indeuouring to preferre king Iohn, other labouring to John.] rather to be vnder the gouernance of Arthur duke of

Matth.
Paris.
Chinon.

Turnham.

ferd by some

PT. I. SC. I. Q. ELEANOR SORE AGAINST ARTHUR.

JOHN IN ENGLAND.

V

Elianors

Britaine, considering that he seemed by most right to be their cheefe lord, forsomuch as he was sonne to Geffrey, elder brother to John. And thus began the broile in those quarters, whereof in processe of time insued great inconuenience, and finallie the death of the said Arthur, as shall be shewed hereafter.'

But Queen Eleanor "being bent to prefer hir sonne A.D. 1199. Iohn, left no stone vnturned to establish him in the [Q. Eleanor throne, comparing oftentimes the difference of gouernement betweene a king that is a man, and a king that is but a child. For as Iohn was 32 yeares old, so Arthur duke of Britaine was but a babe to speake of. In the end, winning all the nobilitie wholie vnto hir will, and [wins over

the nobles.] seeing the coast to be cleare on euerie side, without any doubt of tempestuous weather likelie to arise, she signified the whole matter vnto K. John, who forthwith framed all his indeuours to the accomplishment of his businesse.

'Surelie queene Elianor the kings mother, was sore Queene against his nephue Arthur, rather mooued thereto by enuie enuie against conceiued against his mother, than vpon any iust occasion Arthur. giuen in the behalfe of the child, for that she saw, if he were king, how his mother Constance would looke to Constance beere most rule within the realme of England, till hir sonne should come to lawfull age, to gouerne of himselfe.

... When this dooing of the queene was signified vnto the said Constance, she, doubting the suertiel of hir sonne, committed him to the trust of the French king, who re- [Arthur enceiuing him into his tuition, promised to defend him from

K.Philip II.) all his enimies, and foorthwith furnished the holds in Britaine with French souldiers. Queene Elianor being Queene aduertised hereof, stood in doubt by and by of hir countrie of Guien, and therefore with all possible speed passed Normandie. ouer the sea, and came to hir sonne Iohn into Normandie, and shortlie after they went foorth togither into the countrie of Maine, and there tooke both the citie and castell of Mauns, throwing downe the wals and turrets The city of therof, with all the fortifications and stone-houses in and about the same, and kept the citizens as prisoners, bicause Matth. they had aided Arthur against his vncle Iohn.'

After Easter, king John was invested duke of Normandy, and leaving his mother to defend Guienne, he past over into England, landing at Shoreham on May 25, 1199.

'On the next day, being Ascension eeue, he came to Knjohn London, there to receiue the crowne.'

into Eng. safety

? p. 158, col. 2.

dutchesse of Britaine.

trusted to

Elianor passeth into

Mauns
taken.

. R. Houed.

conieth ouer

land.

1

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