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INDEX.

Age.

-49
.81
70
74
.40

Page
216
192
200

202

.82

73
.81

.90

Class.
1893. *GARABED H. ADALIAN...
1850. GEORGE M. ADAMS, D.D.
1858. *JOHN ANKETELL (non-graduate)
1859. WILLIAM F. ARMS...
1890. *FRED P. BATCHELDER (non-graduate)
1853. JOSEPH A. BENT
1861. JOSEPH P. BIXBY
1848. HENRY BUSHNELL
1840. JAMES D. BUTLER, LL.D.
1854. WILLIAM B. CLARKE (resident licentiate).
1853. *EDWARD P. CLISBEE (non-graduate)
1857. LEVI H. COBB, D.D.
1868. ELLIS R. DRAKE, D.D.
1868. MYRON S. DUDLEY (non-graduate)
1860. JOHN EATON, Ph.D., LL.D. (resident student)
1888. T. MERRILL EDMANDS
1872. PERLEY M. GRIFFIN
1846. BURDETT HART, D.D. (non-graduate)
1852. SIMON J. HUMPHREY, D.D.
1859. BENJAMIN LABAREE, D.D.
1864. JOSEPH A. LEACH (non-graduate)
1855. LEVI G. MARSH (resident licentiate)
1880. THOMAS W. NICKERSON (special course)
1870. *GEORGE L. NIMS
1869. GEORGE T. PACKARD.
1859. DANIEL PHILLIPS
1845. *WILLIAM PORTER
1849. ROGER M. SARGENT, D.D.
1854. JAMES B. SIMMONS, D.D. (non-graduate)
1858. URIEL W. SMALL
1849. CHARLES H. TRASK (non-graduate)
1842. LYMAN WHITING, D.D.
1898. GAVIN H. WRIGHT

-75
- 76
.78
..66
..68
- 76
.47
.64
.84
.85
-72

70
.82

79
..66
..61

-79
..90

215
195
208
190
183
197
196
199
209
210
205
215
213
188
194
203
209
198
214

212

2II

.81

204
187
190
198
202
191
185
216

.78
.80
.81
.89
..33

* Died more than a year'ago, but not previously reported.

[graphic]

NECROLOGY.

ALUMNI.

CLASS OF 1840. James Davie Butler, LL.D.

Son of James Davie Butler and Rachel (Harris) Maynard, the widow of Trowbridge Maynard; born at Rutland, Vt., March 15, 1815; united with the church at Middlebury, Vt., May, 1834; studied in the Rutland schools; went to Boston in October, 1829, to work in the hardware store of his cousin, returning the next summer and studying in a school conducted by the Rev. Hadley Proctor; entered Wesleyan Seminary, Wilbraham, Mass., in April, 1831, remaining a year; was graduated from Middlebury College, 1836, after taking the full course; studied in the Yale Divinity School part of the year 1836–37; was tutor and acting professor at Middlebury College, five terms, 1837–38; studied in this Seminary from November, 1838, until his graduation in 1840; was Abbot resident, 1840-42, but the second year was interrupted by his sailing, June 23, 1842, on a European trip in company with Professor Park, from which he returned in December, 1843, and then completed the year 1843-44 at the Seminary. At that time very few Americans had travelled so extensively in Europe, and on the advice of his friends he prepared lectures on his trip, some of which were delivered more than three hundred times.

He was licensed to preach by the Andover Association, April 7, 1840, meeting at Andover with the Rev. Samuel C. Jackson. He supplied at West Newbury, Mass., from the spring to the autumn, 1844, and at Burlington, Vt., six months from January 19, 1845; was professor of ancient languages and English literature at Norwich University, September, 1845, to 1847, and acting president, 1846–47. In April, 1847, while still professor, he began supplying the church at Wells River, Vt.; was ordained as pastor there October 14, 1847; dismissed, February, 1851, having given the first lectures on European travel ever given in the town, the proceeds being used to obtain books for a library. He was installed as pastor at South Danvers (now Peabody), Mass., February 26, 1851; dismissed, August 4, 1852; was installed pastor of the First Church, Cincinnati, O., November 18, 1852, resigning in December, 1854, as the climate proved unfavorable to his family; was professor of Greek in Wabash College, 1855-58, and professor of Greek in the University of Wisconsin, 1858–67. He resigned his professorship to start for an extensive tour through Europe, Palestine, and Egypt; spent the winter of 1868–69 delivering lectures on his travels; and in July, 1869, travelled over the Union and Central Pacific Railroads, which had just been finished, the chief engineer of the Union Pacific having been one of his pupils at Norwich University. He also spent some time in the Sandwich Islands. In 1870–74 he was busy in visiting the Western Territories in connection with the preparation of literature to be circulated to set forth their attractions and invite immigration. He was engaged in study during 1874-78, continuing to live at Madison, Wis., which was his home the rest of his life. He spent a year in Europe, 1878–79, with one of his daughters; in 1883 he visited Mexico and the Yellowstone Park, and entered Portland, Or., on the first train over the Northern Pacific; in 1884 went to Europe again with another of his daughters for six months; in 1887 he made a journey to Cuba and to various parts of the island; and in 1890–91 he went around the world alone in seventeen months.

He received the degree of doctor of laws from Middlebury College, 1862. He was a member of the American Antiquarian Society from April 26, 1854, a member of the historical societies of Vermont, New York, and Pennsylvania; a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society from March 3, 1847; a member of the Wisconsin Historical Society from August, 1859, its curator, 1860–89, and its vice-president, 1890-99.

He published “Deficiencies in Our History. An Address Delivered before the Vermont Historical and Antiquarian Society,” Montpelier, 1846, 36 pp.; “Sermon at Norwich, Vt., February 22, 1848, during the Obsequies of Truman B. Ransom, Colonel of the Ninth Regiment,” Hanover, N. H., 1848, 20 pp.; “Addresses on the Battle of Bennington and the Life and Services of Col. Seth Warner; Delivered before the Legislature of Vermont, in Montpelier, October 20, 1848, by James Davie Butler and George Frederick Houghton,” Burlington, Vt., 1849, 99 pp.; “Remarks at the Dinner of the Semi-Centennial Celebration of Middlebury College,” 1850, 8 pp.; “A Descriptive Guide to the Connecticut and Passumpsic River Railroad and White Mountains,” Newbury, Vt., 1849, 12 pp.;“Farewell Discourse, Delivered before the Second Congregational Church and Society in Danvers, Mass.,” Salem, Mass., 1852, 23 pp.; “Incentives to Mental Culture among Teachers: Lecture before the American Institute of Instruction,” Boston, 1853, 33 pp.; "Scenes in the Life of Christ, and the Catholic Hierarchy of the United States,” Chicago, 1866, 12 pp.; “Arms mear: The Home, the Arm, and the Armory of Samuel Colt,” largely written by Dr. Butler, New York, 1866, 399 pp.; “Nebraska. Its Characteristics and Prospects,” 1873, 38 pp.; "How Dead Languages Make Live Men. A Defence of Classical Studies. A Paper before the National Educational Association,” Worcester, Mass., 1874, 20 pp.; “Poematia: BloodDrops, Birthday Lines, and Other Verses of Society,” Madison, Wis., 1874, 18 pp.; “Catalogue of Coins and Medals, Ancient and Modern, from the collection of James L. Hill,” Madison, Wis., 1874, 18 pp.; “Prehistoric Wisconsin. Annual Address before the Wisconsin State Historical Society," reprinted from the "Wisconsin Historical Collections," 1876, 31 pp.; "A September Scamper. Nebraska after a Three Years' Absence," Burlington, Io., 1877, 32 pp.; “Cheap Fuel for the Prairies. The Mennonite Grass-Burner; or, the Prairie Pioneer's Pet,” 1879, 8 pp.; “The

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