The Light of Other Days

Front Cover
'Space is what keeps everything from being in the same place. Right?' With these words Hiram Patterson, head of the giant media corporation OurWorld, launches the greatest communications revolution in history. With OurWorld's development of wormhole technology, any point in space can be connected to any other, faster than the speed of light. Realtime television coverage is here: earthquakes and wars, murders and disasters can be watched, exactly as they occur, anywhere on the planet. Then WormCams are made to work across time as well as space. Humanity encounters itself in the light of other days. We witness the life of Jesus, go to the premiere of Hamlet, solve the enigmas that have baffled generations. Blood spilled centuries ago flows vividly once more - and no personal treachery or shame can be concealed. But when the world and everything in it becomes as transparent as glass and there are no more secrets, people find new ways to gain vengeance and commit crime, and Hiram Patterson finds new ways to keep his Machiavellian schemes secret.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
4
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - rondoctor - LibraryThing

Interesting and quick read, but not as good as I expected from these two top authors. Development of advanced technology serves as the centerpiece of the book, but it does so at the expense of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Lyndatrue - LibraryThing

Clarke has written better books than this one, and I suppose Baxter has too. I just couldn't stick with it, and skipped to the end. Funny, I've read books written earlier, and they haven't felt particularly dated, but this one did. It's okay. Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2000)

Arthur C. Clarke was born in Minehead, Somerset, England, on December 16, 1917. During World War II, he served as a radar specialist in the RAF. His first published piece of fiction was Rescue Party and appeared in Astounding Science, May 1946. He graduated from King's College in London with honors in physics and mathematics, and worked in scientific research before turning his attention to writing fiction. His first book, Prelude to Space, was published in 1951. He is best known for his book 2001: A Space Odyssey, which was later turned into a highly successful and controversial film under the direction of Stanley Kubrick. His other works include Childhood's End, Rendezvous with Rama, The Garden of Rama, The Snows of Olympus, 2010: A Space Odyssey II, 2062: Odyssey III, and 3001: The Final Odyssey. During his lifetime, he received at least three Hugo Awards and two Nebula Awards. He died of heart failure on March 19, 2008 at the age of 90.

Bibliographic information