Health, Social Change & Communities

Front Cover
Pranee Liamputtong, Heather Gardner
Oxford University Press, 2003 - Medical - 349 pages
Governments, while concentrating on policy development and the pursuit of strategic approaches, have concurrently distanced themselves from the direct provision of services to become funders, not providers. Funding is provided to agencies, whether from the public or private sector, on the basis of the strength of their competitive tenders and the number of relevant organizations that they have included. The effects that these and other changes in the political and economic sectors have had on Australian society at the beginning of the 21st century are the concern of the authors of Health, Social Change and Communities.

Since communities are both the recipients and the participants in health and social policy, the book is a sympathetic, but critical analysis of some of those community groups, and how they are faring in terms of health and social indicators. All of the chapters focus on the four main areas:
An overview of current social, cultural or epidemiological perspectives relevant to the community and their members' health.
Problems or issues in Australian society as reflective of wider international concerns.
A discussion of relevant health policies and programs.
Measures that can be taken to improve the health of selected groups in the community. Health, Social Change and Communities is written for readers who either have an interest or who are engaged in working with members of communities. With its presentation of diversity in communities, the book provides insights to enlighten and influence thinking about health and social policy.

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Contents

The Health System Participation and Community Groups
3
Consumers and Health Policy Reform
22
Incorporating Voices from the Community into Policy
38
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

Pranee Liamputtong and Heather Gardner are both at La Trobe University, Australia.

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