The Ern Malley affair

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University of Queensland Press, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 284 pages
An account first published in 1993 of one of the literary world's great hoaxes. Describes the circumstances behind the creation of the apocryphal poet, Ern Malley, the publication of his poems in the avant-garde journal 'Angry Penguins', and the subsequent trial of the magazine's unsuspecting editor Max Harris on obscenity charges. The poems are printed in full and for the first time in many years are seriously re-evaluated. Introduction by Robert Hughes. Includes extensive notes and an index. Heyward is a former co-editor of 'Scripsi'.

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User Review  - Salmondaze - LibraryThing

What could I give this book but a perfect score for the hoax poets James McAuley and Harold Stewart pulled off. A hoax in one hand and in the other the greatest modernist expression Australia has ever ... Read full review

Contents

The Death of Ern Malley
3
Enfant Terrible
10
Jim and Harold
28
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Robert Hughes was born on July 28, 1938 in Sydney, Australia. He attended St. Ignatius College and Sydney University before embarking on a career as a freelance writer. In 1970, he became the art critic for Time magazine. Hughes garnered wide acclaim for his book and television series The Shock of the New. Chronicling Hughes's vast knowledge and experience with modern art, The Shock of the New presents the author's views and opinions of many facets of art including contemporary architecture. Hughes's other ground-breaking books include American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America and Culture of Complaint: The Fraying of America. In these, Hughes presents his own unique brand of criticism, not merely on art, but also on American politics. Everyone from Jesse Helms to Ronald Reagan undergoes analysis, and the state of politics in the late 20th century is often lamented.

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