Australian Religions: An Introduction

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Cornell University Press, 1973 - Australia - 205 pages
Critique of the literature on and an examination of Australian Aboriginal ritual and belief focussing on meaning rather than function; supernatural beings, high gods, culture heroes; mythical geography; initiation rites; secret cults; medicine men; death and eschatology; First published in Hist. Relig.

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Contents

Supernatural Beings and High Gods
1
Culture Heroes and Mythical Geography
42
Initiation Rites and Secret Cults
84
Copyright

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About the author (1973)

Born in Bucharest, Rumania, Mircea Eliade studied at the University of Bucharest and, from 1928 to 1932, at the University of Calcutta with Surendranath Dasgupta. After taking his doctorate in 1933 with a dissertation on yoga, he taught at the University of Bucharest and, after the war, at the Sorbonne in Paris. From 1957, Eliade was a professor of the history of religions at the University of Chicago. He was at the same time a writer of fiction, known and appreciated especially in Western Europe, where several of his novels and volumes of short stories appeared in French, German, Spanish, and Portuguese. Two Tales of the Occult "to relate some yogic techniques, and particularly yogic folklore, to a series of events narrated in the genre of a mystery story." Both Nights of Serampore and The Secret of Dr. Honigberger evoke the mythical geography and time of India. Mythology, fantasy, and autobiography are skillfully combined in Eliade's tales.

Victor Turner was born in Scotland and educated in England. He began his career as a research officer with the Rhodes-Livingstone Institute in northern Rhodesia. Best known for his ethnographic studies of ritual and social process among the Ndembu, Turner also produced significant theoretical insights about rites of passage, the psychology of healing, conflict management, the importance of drama and play, and the theory of symbolic interpretation. He spent much of his career at universities in the United States and was among the leading figures in the turn to symbolic interpretation that marked American anthropology during the 1960s and 1970s.

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