China's Transition to a Global Economy

Front Cover
Michael Webber, Mark Wang, Zhu Ying
Palgrave Macmillan, Dec 13, 2002 - Business & Economics - 274 pages
China's Transition to a Global Economy analyses the nature of globalization in China and assesses its implications not only for the study of globalization itself but also that of regionalization and transition. China's approach to the global economy has so far stressed the liberalization of trade and investment flows and the development of a market economy. Important identifiers of globalization in China are thus the flows of labour, commodities and capital across borders and the emergence of market forms of organization. By these indexes, globalization in China has been gradual and uneven. As part of its approach to the global economy, the Chinese government has sought to manipulate the geography of economic development, both at the macro and local level. Examples include regional policies, special economic zones and high technology zones. Studies of these processes are complemented by two iconic examples of globalization and industrial development - a traditional industry (textiles) and a new industry (personal computers).

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About the author (2002)

ZHIYU SHEN Associate Professor, Institute of Industrial Economics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, China JICI WANG Professor of Geography, Bejing University, China HOUKAI WEI Associate Professor, Institute of Industrial Economics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, China