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Books Books 91 - 100 of 134 on I dine, I play a game of backgammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends; and....
" I dine, I play a game of backgammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends; and when, after three or four hours... "
Blackwood's Magazine - Page 712
1869
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Encountering Religious Pluralism: The Challenge to Christian Faith & Mission

Harold Netland - Religion - 2001 - 368 pages
...dispelling these clouds [of doubt], nature herself suffices for that purpose. ... I dine, I play a game of backgammon, I converse and am merry with my friends;...speculations, they appear so cold and strained and 37For helpful introductions to Hume's epistemology, see David Fate Norton, David Hume: Common Sense...
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Skepticism and the Veil of Perception

Michael Huemer - Philosophy - 2001 - 209 pages
...characterization of skepticism in chapter I. 16. Hume admitted this in a famous passage: 1 dine, I play a game of back-gammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends; and when after three or four hours' amusement, I wou'd return to these speculations, they appear so cold, and strain'd, and ridiculous, that I cannot...
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Causality in Macroeconomics

Kevin D. Hoover - Business & Economics - 2001 - 311 pages
...avocation, and lively impression of my senses. which obliterate all these chimeras. I dine. I play a game of back-gammon. I converse, and am merry with my friends; and when after three or four hour's amusement, I wou'd return to these speculations, they appear cold, and strain'd and ridiculous,...
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Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Hume on Religion

David O'Connor - Philosophy - 2001 - 227 pages
...avocation, and lively impression of my senses, which obliterate all these chimeras. I dine. I play a game of back-gammon. I converse, and am merry with my friends; and when after three or four hour's amusement, I wou'd return to these speculations, they appear so cold, and strain'd, and ridiculous,...
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The Skeptical Sublime: Aesthetic Ideology in Pope and the Tory Satirists

James Noggle - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 288 pages
...back-gammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends" and finds his foregoing doubts "so cold, and strain'd, and ridiculous, that I cannot find in my heart to enter into them any farther" (269). As in Rochester, the terrifying image of doubt as a boundless ocean ironically supports...
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The Creation of the Modern World: The Untold Story of the British Enlightenment

Roy Porter - History - 2000 - 727 pages
...with my friends; and when ... I wou'd return to these speculations, they appear so cold, and strain'd, and ridiculous, that I cannot find in my heart to enter into them any farther.' 96 'Be a philosopher,' he concluded; 'but amidst all your philosophy be still a man.' 97...
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The Liar's Tale: A History of Falsehood

Jeremy Campbell - Philosophy - 2002 - 368 pages
...and lively impression of my senses, which obliterates all these chimeras. I dine, I play a game of backgammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends;...that I cannot find in my heart to enter into them any farther." Hume did not share the Cartesian belief that the work of a solitary designer, a lone craftsman,...
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Philosophy and Living

Ralph Blumenau - Philosophy - 2002 - 630 pages
...prepared to take Hume seriously. He had confessed in the book that sometimes his speculations, "appeared so cold, and strained and ridiculous that I cannot find in my heart to enter into them any further". Hume seemed to say that Philosophy can lead us to conclusions which are totally at variance with the...
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Rosalind Krauss and American Philosophical Art Criticism: From Formalism to ...

David Carrier - Art - 2002 - 124 pages
...have an idea of the self, then what knowledge is secure? But, he continues: I dine, I play a game of back-gammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends; and when after three or four hours' amusement, I wou'd return to these speculations, they appear so cold, and strain'd, and ridiculous, that I cannot...
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British Philosophy: Hobbes to Hume

Frederick Copleston - Philosophy - 2003 - 440 pages
...incapable of dispelling these clouds, nature herself suffices to that purpose. ... I dine, I play a game of backgammon, I converse and am merry with my friends;...that I cannot find in my heart to enter into them any farther. Here then 1 T., i, 4. 2. p. 218. E., 12. 2. 128, pp. 159-60. I find myself absolutely and...
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