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Books Books 91 - 100 of 148 on And husband nature's riches from expense ; They are the lords and owners of their....
" And husband nature's riches from expense ; They are the lords and owners of their faces, Others but stewards of their excellence. The summer's flower is to the summer sweet, Though to itself it only live and die, But if that flower with base infection... "
Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen - Page 215
1903
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The Poems and Sonnets of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1994 - 197 pages
...only live and die; But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity: For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. 95 How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame Which, like a canker in the fragrant rose,...
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Selected Poems

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1995 - 128 pages
...only live and die; But if that flow'r with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity: For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. 94 How like a winter hath my absence been From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year! What...
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Shakespeare's Sonnets

William Shakespeare, Adrian Raymond - Sonnets, English - 1963 - 182 pages
...only live and die, But if that flower with base infection meet The basest weed outbraves his dignity; For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds: Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. 94 2 canker - this could either be the canker worm, destroying the rose in bud, or a dog-rose...
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The Quest for the Fine: A Philosophical Inquiry Into Judgement, Worth, and ...

Michael Gelven - Philosophy - 1996 - 166 pages
...power. In the couplet of another sonnet, ninety-four, Shakespeare sees this with horrific clarity: "Sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;/ Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds." It would seem, therefore, that though there may be an aesthetics of the fine there cannot be...
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Poetic Designs: An Introduction to Meters, Verse Forms, and Figures of Speech

Stephen Adams - Poetry - 1997 - 256 pages
...only live and die, But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves its dignity: For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. Here, the octave introduces the subject and the sestet the principal metaphor, and Shakespeare...
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Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - Reference - 1998 - 669 pages
...I had thee. as a dream doth flatter, In sleep a king, but, waking, no such matter. 10556 Sonnet 94 for opinlon in good men is but knowledge in the making. 7464 Areopagitica Methinks I see weeds. 10557 Sonnet 97 How like a winter hath my absence been From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting...
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Shakespeare's Sonnets: Third Series

William Shakespeare, Katherine Duncan-Jones - Drama - 1997 - 488 pages
...only live and die, But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity: For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. 10 to compel the Countess of Salisbury to yield to him. (Cf. Proudfoot, 181). The line oecurs...
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The Guide to Literary Terms

Gail Rae - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 128 pages
...only live and die; But if that flow'r with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity. For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds: Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. see: couplet Spoonerism - a phrase in which two words' initial consonants have been switched...
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The Power of Servant-leadership: Essays

Robert K. Greenleaf, Larry C. Spears - Business & Economics - 1998 - 313 pages
...will do none. (Not very little, but none.) This is the sonnet that concludes with those caustic Unes: For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. The intervening eleven lines will bear close scrutiny. The firm aim of the servant is that no...
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Power to Hurt: The Virtues of Alienation

William Frank Monroe - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 243 pages
...only live and die; But if that flow'r with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity: For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.' Shakespeare's sonnet 94 evaluates the wounds of alienation and performance. The poem can be...
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