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Books Books 81 - 90 of 179 on For I have sworn thee fair and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as....
" For I have sworn thee fair and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. "
Supplement to the Edition of Shakespeare's Plays Published in 1778 - Page 699
by William Shakespeare - 1780
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Nojoque: A Question for a Continent

Hinton Rowan Helper - African Americans - 1867 - 479 pages
...gardens of paradise." In one of his Sonnets, (CXITVTI.,) Shakspeare complains that, " I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night." As if directly addressing the debased white aiders and abettors of the abandoned blacks, (as if addressing...
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The Golden Treasury of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language

English poetry - 1867 - 332 pages
...hand to touch thee deign, Like widow'd turtle still her loss complain. XXXIX W. Drummond BLIND LOVE O me ! what eyes hath love put in my head Which have no correspondence with true sight : Or if they have, where is my judgment fled That censures falsely what...
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The Handy-volume Shakspeare [ed. by Q.D.].

William Shakespeare - 1867
...are, At random from the truth vainly express'd ; For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, O me ! what eyes hath Love put in my head, Which have no correspondence with true sight ! Or, if they have, where is my judgment fled, That censures falsely...
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acrhiv

ludwid herric - 1867
...thoughts and my discourse as madmen's are, At random from the truth vainly express'd; •For I have sworn thee fair and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, "us dark as night. but also for this reason that the Princess says, „well bandied both a ol wit well...
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Studies of Shakspere

Charles Knight - 1868 - 560 pages
...thoughts and my discourse as mad men's are, At random from the truth vainly cxpress'd : For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night —117. 0 me ! what eyes hath love put in my head. Which have no correspondence with true sight ? Or,...
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Studies of Shakspere

Charles Knight - 1868 - 560 pages
...thoughts and my discourse as mad men's are, At random from the truth vainly cxpress'd ; For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. —147. O me ! what eyes hath love put in my head. Which have no correspondence with true sight '!...
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An Introduction to the Philosophy of Shakespeare's Sonnets

Richard Simpson - 1868 - 82 pages
...conducts its victim to frantic, and at the same time conscious, madness — ]''or I have sworn tbee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night — (147) — to voluntary blindness (148), to a complete and fawning submission of his acts and sentiments...
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To ti en einai. Die Idee Shakespeare's und deren Verwirklichung ...

Carl Karpf - 1869 - 166 pages
...thoughts and my discourse as madmen's are, At random from the truth vainly express'd; For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. Sonett 148. O me! what eyes hath love put in my head, Which have no correspondence with true sight!...
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The complete works of Shakspere, with a memoir, and essay, by ..., Volume 3

Richard Grant White - 1870
...thoughts and my discourse as madmen's are, At random from the truth vainly expressed : For I have sworn thee fair and thought thee bright, Who art as black...hell, as dark as night. CXLVIII. O me ! what eyes hnth Love put in my head, Which have no correspondence with true sight I Or if they have where is my...
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THE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

RICHARD GRANT WHITE - 1871
...unrest : My thoughts and my discourse as madmen's are9 At random from the truth vainly express'd ; CXLVIII. O me, what eyes hath Love put in my head, Which have no correspondence with true sight ! Or, if they have, where is my judgment fled. That censures falsely...
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