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" Is there not a temptation to close to some extent with Lucretius, when he affirms that' Nature is seen to do all things spontaneously of herself, without the meddling of the gods'? "
The Progress of the Century - Page 7
1901 - 582 pages
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Edward Nangle: the apostle of Achill: a memoir and a history

Henry Seddall - 1884 - 380 pages
...address : " Is there not a temptation to close to some extent with Lucretius when he affirms that 'Nature is seen to do all things spontaneously of herself without the meddling of the gods ' ? or with Bruno, when he declares that matter is not 'that mere empty capacity which philosophers...
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The Consolations of Science: Or, Contributions from Science to the Hope of ...

Jacob Straub - Future life - 1884 - 435 pages
...* Is there not a temptation to close to some extent with Lucretius, when he affirms that, ' Nature is seen to do all things spontaneously of herself without the meddling of the gods ? ' or with Bruno, when he declares that nature is not • that mere empty capacity which philosophers...
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Fragments of Science: A Series of Detached Essays, Addresses and Reviews

John Tyndall - Science - 1884 - 589 pages
...life ? Is there not a temptation to close to some extent with Lucretius, when he affirms that ' Nature is seen to do all things spontaneously of herself without the meddling of the god3 ? ' or with Bruno, when he declares that Matter is not * that mere empty capacity which philosophers...
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The Medical Times and Gazette, Volume 2

1874
...immeasurable ranges of space and time, suggested the nebular hypothesis to Kant, its first propounder. ' If you will apprehend and keep in mind these things,...spontaneously of herself, without the meddling of the gods.' " Then came the darkness of the Middle Ages ; and, as the Professor quotes from Lord Bacon, " at a...
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The Neanderthal skull on evolution, in an address supposed to be delivered A ...

Bourchier Wrey Savile - 1885
...Matter Is there not a temptation to close to some extent with Lucretius, when he affirms that ' Nature is seen to do all things spontaneously of herself, without the meddling, of the gods ? ' — or with Bruno, when he declares ' Matter to be the universal mother, who brings forth all things...
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Agnosticism: Sermons Preached in St. Peter's, Cranley Gardens, 1883-4

Alfred Williams Momerie - Agnosticism - 1887 - 308 pages
...mechanical cause." The whole view of Haeckel may be summed up in a sentence from Lucretius : " Nature is seen to do all things spontaneously of herself, without the meddling of the gods." Xow my answer to Haeckel, and to the agnostics generally, is this. They fail to distinguish between...
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Witnesses to Christ: A Contribution to Christian Apologetics

William Robinson Clark - Apologetics - 1888 - 300 pages
...be pointed out that in the Belfast Address he quotes with approval the words of Lucretius: " Nature is seen to do all things spontaneously of herself without the meddling of the Gods." But it is quite clear that such approval, on his part, was not intended to teach atheism, although...
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The Genesis of Nature Considered in the Light of Mr. Spencer's Philosophy ...

Thomas Hubbard Musick - Force and energy - 1890 - 377 pages
...life ? Is there not a temptation to close to some extent with Lucretius, when he affirms that Nature is seen to do all things spontaneously of herself without the meddling of the gods ? or, with Bruno, when he declares that matter is not that mere empty capacity which philosophers have...
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Fragments of Science: a Series of Detached Essays, Addresses and ..., Volume 2

John Tyndall - Science - 1892 - 686 pages
...kind, they fell at length into the arrangements out of which this system of things has been evolved. ' If you will apprehend and keep in mind these things,...spontaneously of herself, without the meddling of the gods.' l To meet the objection that his atoms cannot be Been, Lucretius describes a violent storm, and shows...
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Nineteenth century questions

James Freeman Clarke - History - 1897 - 368 pages
...says: " Is there not a temptation to close to some extent with Lucretius, when he affirms that nature is seen to do all things spontaneously of herself without the meddling of the gods ? " But this last sentence shows a singular vacillation in so clear a thinker as Tyndall. How can one...
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