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Books Books 31 - 40 of 185 on I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of....
" I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,... "
Remarks on Mr. J. P. Collier's and Mr. C. Knight's Editions of Shakespeare - Page 35
by Alexander Dyce - 1844 - 299 pages
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare

William Shakespeare - 1826
...phrase. The first quarto has : — ' Nay, then I see how the wind the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame,...
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The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany, Volume 95

1825
...seems inclined to become blank verse if it could. The passage from Shakespeare I will here .Insert. " I have of late, (but wherefore I know not,) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed It goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, with notes original and selected ...

William Shakespeare, Charles Symmons - 1826
...phrase. The first quarto has:—' Nay, then I see how the wind the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises: and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the...
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The Beauties of Shakspeare Regularly Selected from Each Play. With a General ...

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 345 pages
...nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so; to me it is a prison. REFLECTIONS ON MAN. I hare of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,} lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises: and indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the...
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Essais littéraires sur Shakspeare; ou, Analyse raisonnée, scène ..., Volume 1

Paul Duport - 1828
...que l'homme ! Combien noble dans son intelligence ! Combien infini dans ses facultés! Combien *, (9) I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not), lost all my mirth , forgone all custom of exercises : and , indeed , it goes so heavily with my disposition , that this goodly frame...
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The study of medicine, Volume 4

John Mason Good - 1829
...and re- dmra7°D~ marks. The first stage of the disease is thus admirably Well expressed by Hamlet: "I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercise; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art ..., Volume 5

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...green, And placed under a stately campy, The warlike feats of both those knights to «ec. Faerie Queene. I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth — Indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a...
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Miscellaneous Essays

Mathew Carey - African Americans - 1830 - 472 pages
...conversation with these courtiers, Hamlet launches out into the most profound and sublime reflections. Ham. I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not), lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises: and, indeed, it goos BO heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, tho...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1830
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises: and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1830
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly...
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