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Books Books 71 - 80 of 176 on Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon....
" Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten ; In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy- buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move,... "
The Plays of William Shakspeare: In Fifteen Volumes. With the Corrections ... - Page 400
by William Shakespeare - 1793
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Early English Poems, Chaucer to Pope: Chiefly Unabridged; Illustrated with ...

English poetry - 1863 - 308 pages
...ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs; All these in me no means can move To come to thee and be thy love. But could youth last, and love still breed, Had joys no date, nor age no need, Then these delights...
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Favourite English Poems: A Collection of Some of the Most ..., Volume 1

English poetry - 1863
...ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs ; All these in me no means can move To come to thee and be thy love. But could youth last, and love still breed, Had joys no date, nor age no need, Then these delights...
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Flowers and fruit gathered by loving hands from old English gardens ...

Emily Taylor - 1864
...ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move To come to thee, and be thy love. But, could youth last, and still love breed, Had joys no date, nor age no need, Then these delights...
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Chambers's readings in English poetry

Chambers W. and R., ltd - 1865
...ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy-buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move, To come to thee, and be thy love. What should we talk of dainties then, Of better meat than 's fit for men ? These are but vain ; that 's...
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Foliorum silvula, selections for translation into Latin and Greek verse, by ...

Hubert Ashton Holden - 1866
...spring, but sorrow's fall. Thy belt of straw, and ivy buds, thy coral clasps, and amber studs ; all these in me no means can move to come to thee, and be thy Love. But could youth last, and love still breed, had joys no date, nor age no need ; then those delights...
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The Lovers' Dictionary: A Poetical Treasury of Lovers' Thoughts, Fancies ...

1867 - 789 pages
...ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs ; All these in me no means can move, To come to thee, and be thy love. But could faith last, and love still breed, Had joys no date, nor age no need; Then these delights...
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Lyra Elegantiarum

Frederick Locker-Lampson - Society verse - 1867 - 360 pages
...ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw, and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps, and amber studs, All these in me no means can move, To come to thee, and be thy love. But could youth last, and love still breed, Had joys no date, and age no need ; Then these delights...
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Specimens of English poetry. For the use of Charterhouse school

English poetry - English poetry - 1867 - 315 pages
...ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move, To come to thee, and be thy love. 20 But could youth last, and love still breed, Had joy no date, nor age no need ; Then these delights...
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Extracts from English literature

John Rolfe - 1867 - 383 pages
...ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy-buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move, To come to thee and be thy love. But could youth last, and love still breed, Had joys no date, nor Age no need, Then these delights...
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A household book of English poetry, selected with notes by R.C. Trench

Richard Chenevix Trench (abp. of Dublin) - 1868
...ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy-buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move, To come to thee, and be thy love. 20 What should we talk of dainties then, Of better meat than's fit for men ? These are but vain : that's...
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