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Books Books 71 - 80 of 182 on The seasons' difference ; as, the icy fang, And churlish chiding of the winter's....
" The seasons' difference ; as, the icy fang, And churlish chiding of the winter's wind; Which when it bites and blows upon my body, Even till I shrink with cold, I smile, and say, — This is no flattery: these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me... "
Moral and Religious Quotations from the Poets: Topically Arranged ... - Page 286
1861 - 338 pages
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Midsummer-night's dream. Love's ...

William Shakespeare, Charles Symmons, John Payne Collier - 1839
...painted pomp ? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court ? Here feel we not l the penalty of Adam, The seasons' difference ; as...smile, and say, — This is no flattery ; these are counsellors, That feelingly persuade me what I am. d Sweet are the uses of adversity ; * Which, like...
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An Essay on Elocution: Designed for the Use of Schools and Private Learners

Samuel Kirkham - Elocution - 1839 - 357 pages
...be apt to degenerate into a singsong, or mere gingling of rhymes. REMARKS ON SECTIONS VII. AND VIII. The seasons' difference' ; as the icy fang', And churlish...say', " THIS' . . is no flattery' : THESE' . . are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am*. > Sweet are the uses of adversity* ; Which', like...
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The Wisdom and Genius of Shakespeare: Comprising Moral Philosophy ...

William Shakespeare, Thomas Price - 1839 - 460 pages
...woods More free from peril than the envious court 1 Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The season's difference ; as, the icy fang, And churlish chiding...smile, and say, — This is no flattery : these are counsellors, That feelingly persuade me what I am. ****** And this our life, exempt from public haunt,...
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Fair Rosamond; or, The days of king Henry ii

Thomas Miller - 1839
...woods More free from peril than the envious court 1 Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The season's difference ; as the icy fang, And churlish chiding...smile, and say,— This is no flattery : these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am. I Ai You Likt It. •' THE night which set in upon...
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Tales and Ballads

Caroline Howard Gilman - 1884 - 190 pages
...woods More free from peril than the envious court? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The season's difference, as the icy fang And churlish chiding of...cold, I smile and say. "This is no flattery; these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am." Sweet are the uses of adversity. Which, like a toad,...
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The Sporting review, ed. by 'Craven'.

John William Carleton
...woods More free from peril than the envious court ? Here feel we bat the penalty of Adam, The season's difference , as the icy fang, And churlish chiding...cold, I smile, and say — This is no flattery : these arc counsellors, That feelingly persuade me what I am." But the reader will be disposed to ask the...
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Twelfth night. Much ado about nothing. As you like it

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1841
...that of painted pomp ? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court ? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The seasons' difference ;...churlish chiding of the winter's wind ; Which when it hites and hlows upon my body, Even till I shrink with cold ; I smile, and say, — This is no flattery...
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The Philosophy of Shakspere: Extracted from His Plays

William Shakespeare, Michael Henry Rankin - 1841 - 238 pages
...woods More free from peril than the envious court ? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The season's difference ; as, the icy fang And churlish chiding...wind ; Which, when it bites and blows upon my body, E'en till I shrink with cold, I smile, and say— This is no flattery : these are counsellors That...
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De Clifford; or, The constant man, by the author of 'Tremaine'.

Robert Plumer Ward, De Clifford (fict.name.) - 1841
...designing, and the envious. Here, said I, ' Feel I but the penalty of Adam, The difference of the seasons. As the icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's...wind, Which when it bites and blows upon my body, E'en till I shrink with cold, I smile and say, These are no flatterers.'" He said this with an animation...
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De Clifford, or, the Constant man, Volume 3

Robert Plumer Ward - English fiction - 1841
...designing, and the envious. Here, said I, ' Feel I but the penalty of Adam, The difference of the seasons. As the icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's...wind, Which when it bites and blows upon my body, E'en till I shrink with cold, I smile and say, These are no flatterers. ' " He said this with an animation...
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