Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 61 - 70 of 99 on Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world,....
" Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres. Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest,... "
The works of Christopher Marlowe: with notes and some account of his life ... - Page 50
by Christopher Marlowe, Alexander Dyce - 1850
Full view - About this book

Themes and Conventions of Elizabethan Tragedy

M. C. Bradbrook - Drama - 1980 - 270 pages
...this divine striving. The extraordinary drop at the end of 'Nature that framed us of four elements' to That perfect bliss and sole felicity The sweet fruition of an earthly crown (n. vii. 2Sff) has been often observed. It is in vain that Marlowe insists that Tamburlaine despises...
Limited preview - About this book

Threshold of a Nation: A Study in English and Irish Drama

Philip Edwards - Drama - 1983 - 284 pages
...the aspiring mind of man Wills us to wear ourselves and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. (II.vii.26-9) It is hard to understand how so sensitive a critic as Una Ellis-Fermor could possibly...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare's Metrical Art

George T. Wright - Poetry - 1988 - 363 pages
...| the restless spheres, Wills us | to wear ourselves and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That per|fect bliss and sole felic|ity, The sweet frui|tion of | an earthly crown. (Tamk,rlam, the Great. Part 1,2.7.18-29) As Clemen says: "The scene is built up as a strictly organized...
Limited preview - About this book

Women's Place in Pope's World

Valerie Rumbold - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 315 pages
...speech evokes from one of Tamburlaine's followers a remark highly pertinent to the Unfortunate Lady: And that made me to join with Tamburlaine; For he...princely deeds Doth mean to soar above the highest sort. (II. 7. 30) This is precisely the justification to which Pope turns, replacing dichotomies of virtue...
Limited preview - About this book

Elizabethan Marlowe: Writing and Culture in the English Renaissance

William Zunder - Drama - 1994 - 113 pages
...as the restless spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. (Parti, II. 7. 18-29) The speech is delivered by Tamburlaine directly to the audience. And it deliberately...
Limited preview - About this book

Edward the Second

Christopher Marlowe, Charles R. Forker - Drama - 1995 - 384 pages
...must surely have recalled in these passages Tamburlaine's similar restlessness, his upward thrust for 'That perfect bliss and sole felicity, / The sweet fruition of an earthly crown' (1 Tamburlaine, 1I.vii. 28-29). Yet how unlike Tamburlaine, 'Of stature tall, and straightly fashioned'...
Limited preview - About this book

Christopher Marlowe: The Critical Heritage

Millar MacLure - Reference - 1995 - 207 pages
...as the restless spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown, (ii. 7.) The ear exults in the sonorous march of the stately verse as each successive line paces more...
Limited preview - About this book

Diverse Times, Sundry Places

Donald Maitland - Political Science - 1996 - 310 pages
...moving as the restless Spheres, Will us to wear ourselves and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. Frank Borman was moved. He in turn charmed us all when, asked how the moon had looked from Apollo VIII,...
Limited preview - About this book

Computational Differential Equations, Volume 1

K. Eriksson - Mathematics - 1996 - 538 pages
...as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. (C. Marlowe, 1564-1593) 9. Scalar Initial Value Problems Figure 9.9: The house in Hannover where Leibniz...
Limited preview - About this book

Famous Lines: A Columbia Dictionary of Familiar Quotations

Robert Andrews - Reference - 1997 - 625 pages
...situation which common sense, without the grace of genius, can deal with successfully. 5 The ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE, (1564-1593) British dramatist, poet. TamI mi 1. 1 1 ni', in Tamburlaine the Great,...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download PDF