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Books Books 81 - 90 of 98 on Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world,....
" Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres. Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest,... "
The works of Christopher Marlowe: with notes and some account of his life ... - Page 50
by Christopher Marlowe, Alexander Dyce - 1850
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Banquets Set Forth: Banqueting in English Renaissance Drama

Chris Meads - Drama - 2001 - 257 pages
...sweetness of a crown . . . Wills us to wear ourselves and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. (2.7.12-29) Such images render appropriate the 'second course of crowns' served into the banquet, just...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 47

Stanley Wells - Drama - 2002 - 300 pages
...subdued to Tamburlaine. (2.1.7-u; 27- 30)" And Theridamas likewise describes Tamburlaine's stature: For he is gross and like the massy earth That moves not upwards, nor by princely deeds Doth man to soar above the highest sort. (2.7.31-3) Alleyn apparently achieved his desired effect through...
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Tamburlaine

Christopher Marlowe - Drama - 2002 - 132 pages
...as the restless sphere, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The Sweet fruition of an earthly crown. At the end of Part I, Tamburlaine basks in the glory of his "earthly crown." However, the conqueror's...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 24

Kenneth Muir - Drama - 2002 - 204 pages
...as the resdess spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. (H, vii, 18-29) These are the words with which Tamburlaine eventually consents to become king of Persia....
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The Kabbalah of the Soul: The Transformative Psychology and Practices of ...

Leonora Leet - Religion - 2003 - 384 pages
...(2.5.53—54). And it is "our souls," he argues, which bid us "never rest / Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, / That perfect bliss and sole felicity, / The sweet fruition of an earthly crown" (2.7.21, 26-29). The soul pursued this course in the mistaken though happy belief that the unbridled...
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English Ethnicity and Race in Early Modern Drama

Mary Floyd-Wilson - Drama - 2003 - 256 pages
...Tamburlaine conceive of triumph as the cessation of movement: and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. (2. But in articulating the expansiveness of his "aspiring mind," which seeks "knowledge infinite"...
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Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare

Stephen Greenblatt - Biography & Autobiography - 2004 - 430 pages
...as the restless spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all: That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. (2.7.18-29) For the space of this play, all of the moral rules inculcated in schools and churches,...
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The Lure of Perfection: Fashion and Ballet, 1780-1830

Judith Chazin-Bennahum - Design - 2005 - 280 pages
...as the restless spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown. (1.2.7.18-29)39 Like Lear, Gillies observes, Tamburlaine is "a cartographized extension of the human...
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War and Words: Horror and Heroism in the Literature of Warfare

Sara Munson Deats, Lagretta Tallent Lenker, Merry G. Perry - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 353 pages
...as the restless spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves and never rest Until we reach the ripest fruit of all. That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.13 In this speech, well-known to every Marlovian student and scholar, Tamburlaine aligns his...
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The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe

Patrick Cheney - Drama - 2004 - 312 pages
...Shakespeare's appropriation and containment of Marlowe's poetics, showing how Tamburlaine's evocation of 'That perfect bliss and sole felicity, / The sweet fruition of an earthly crown' (2.7.28-9), informs Richard of Gloucester's rapture: 'How sweet a thing it is to wear a crown, / Within...
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