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Books Books 41 - 50 of 145 on Nay: we hold with Jefferson, to the inalienable right of Communities to alter or....
" Nay: we hold with Jefferson, to the inalienable right of Communities to alter or abolish forms of Government that have become oppressive or injurious ; and, if the Cotton States shall decide that they can do better out of the Union than in it, we insist... "
Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and ... - Page 265
edited by - 1906
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A History of Georgia for Use in Schools

Lawton Bryan Evans - Georgia - 1900 - 352 pages
...side." — Daniel Webster. "If the Cotton States shall decide that they can do better out of the Union, we insist on letting them go in peace. The right to secede maybe a revolutionary one, but it exists nevertheless." — Horace Qreeley. "If a State should withdraw...
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Abraham Lincoln and the men of his time, Volume 2

Robert Henry Browne - United States - 1901
...alter or abolish forms of government that have become oppressive or injurious; and if the Cotton States can do better out of the Union than in it, we insist...letting them go in peace. The right to secede may be revolutionary, but it exists, nevertheless; and we do not see how one party can have the right to do...
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Ohio's silver-tongued orator: life and speeches of General William H. Gibson ...

David Dwight Bigger - 1901 - 540 pages
...only three days after Mr. Lincoln's election that Greeley wrote, "If the cotton States feel satisfied that they can do better out of the Union than in it, we insist on letting them go in peace." At the Republican jubilee at Springfield, Illinois, Lincoln's home, the president-elect had spoken...
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The True History of the Civil War

Guy Carleton Lee - 1903
...1860, so thorough a Northerner as Horace Greeley said: " We hold, with Jefferson, to the inalienable right of communities to alter or abolish forms of...peace. The right to secede may be a revolutionary right, but it exists, nevertheless ; and we do not see how one party can have a right to do what another...
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The True History of the Civil War

Guy Carleton Lee - United States - 1903 - 421 pages
...186o, so thorough a Northerner as Horace Greeley said: " We hold, with Jefferson, to the inalienable right of communities to alter or abolish forms of...peace. The right to secede may be a revolutionary right, but it exists, nevertheless; and we do not see how one party can have a right to do what another...
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Henry Ward Beecher

Lyman Abbott - Congregational churches - 1903 - 457 pages
...most influential journal of the Republican party, in a leading arL tide said : '. If the cotton states decide that they can do better out of the Union than in it, we insist on letting them go in peace. . . . We hope never to live in a republic whereof one section is pinned to the residue by bayonets."...
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Henry Ward Beecher as His Friends Saw Him

Lyman (Theologe) Abbott - 1904 - 135 pages
...out by compromise, so influential a journal as The New York Tribune said that " if the Cotton States decide that they can do better out of the Union than in it, we insist on letting them go in peace," and so clear-headed and loyal a statesman as Charles Francis Adams advocated the summoning of a conference...
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The History of Nations, Volume 24

Henry Cabot Lodge - World history - 1906
...Northern people, when on November 9, 1860, he wrote : " We hold, with Jefferson, to the inalienable right of communities to alter or abolish forms of...peace. The right to secede may be a revolutionary right, but it exists nevertheless; and we do not see how one party can have a right to do what another...
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THE AMERICAN NATION A HISTORY VOLUME 19 CAUSES OF THE CIVIL WAR

FRENCH ENSOR CHADWICK - 1906
...was a power throughout the North, was proclaiming that "if the Cotton Statesshall become satisfied that they can do better out of the Union than in it, we insist on letting them go in peace";* and, again, that "Five millions of people, more than half of them of the dominant race, of whom at...
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Causes of the Civil War, 1859-1861, Volume 19

French Ensor Chadwick - United States - 1906 - 372 pages
...was a power throughout the North, was proclaiming that "if the Cotton States, shall become satisfied that they can do better out of the Union than in it, we insist on letting them go in peace";1 and, again, that "Five millions of people, more than half of them of the dominant race, of...
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