Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 121 - 127 of 127 on And, to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind. Methinks I should know....
" And, to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind. Methinks I should know you and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly ignorant What place this is, and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge... "
Characters of Shakespear's plays - Page 173
by William Hazlitt - 1818
Full view - About this book

Justice Denied: The Destruction of the Life and Legacy of the He-Coon

Bobbye Sikes Wicke - Biography & Autobiography - 2005 - 355 pages
...an hour more nor less; And, to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind. Methinks I should know you, and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for...as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child... King Lear, Shakespeare EXODUS HE-COON September 26, 1994 On Monday night, his second wife called to...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare and the Confines of Art

Philip Edwards - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 170 pages
...possible ending for the play. The three-fold movement is complete in this moving scene of reintegration. - Do not laugh at me, For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. - And so I am, I am. - Be your tears wet? Yes, faith. I pray weep not. You must bear with me. Pray...
Limited preview - About this book

The Best Loved Plays of Shakespeare

Jennifer Mulherin, William Shakespeare, Abigail Frost - English literature - 2004 - 160 pages
...rogues Talk of court news. Act v Sc iii Reunion I fear I am not in my perfect mind Methinks I should know you and know this man; Yet I am doubtful: for...a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. Act iv Sc vii Albany has now read Oswald's letter. He arrests Edmund as a traitor, and challenges him...
Limited preview - About this book

King Lear

Jeffrey Kahan - Lear, King (Legendary character), in literature - 2006 - 63 pages
...lucidly, he said, 'I am a very foolish old man.' Then, peering into the face of his daughter, he said. 'Do not laugh at me, for as I am a man, I think this lady to be my child Cordelia.' 'And so I am. I am,' replied Cordelia, as tears of joy streamed down her cheeks. 'Am I in France?'...
Limited preview - About this book

Criticism As Dialogue

Stein, Walter Stein - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 268 pages
...join'd Your high-engendered battles 'gainst a head So old and white as this. O ! O ! 'tis foul — I am mainly ignorant What place this is, and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments — ? Which is the more absolute for human transformation (though Camus's hunger for justice and brotherhood...
Limited preview - About this book

Seeming Knowledge: Shakespeare and Skeptical Faith

John D. Cox - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 348 pages
...not an hour more or less; And, to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind. Methinks I should know you, and know this man, Yet I am doubtful; for...a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. (4.7.61-71) For the first time he "deals plainly," as Cordelia had dealt with him in the opening scene...
Limited preview - About this book

Jamestown: A Novel

Matthew Sharpe - Fiction - 2007 - 320 pages
...this hut. Where am I?" "I don't know, some hut somewhere. One of the lesser huts of your kingdom." "Do not laugh at me, for as I am a man I think this lady to be my child Pocahontas." "Right, that's what I'm saying." "Be your tears wet?" "No, they're fake, plastic tears,...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF