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Books Books 121 - 130 of 130 on I'll never Be such a gosling to obey instinct, but stand, As if a man were author....
" I'll never Be such a gosling to obey instinct, but stand, As if a man were author of himself And knew no other kin. "
Essays on English Studies - Page 108
by Henry Norman Hudson - 1906 - 206 pages
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Shakespeare's Tragic Sequence

Kenneth Muir - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 207 pages
...of human kindness, but with a boast grimly echoing the self-sufficiency of Shakespeare's villains, stand As if a man were author of himself And knew no other kin. He struggles against the tenderness which is eroding his resolution; and he rises at the end of Volumnia's...
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Patterns in Shakespearian Tragedy

Irving Ribner - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 205 pages
...which asserts itself by a denial of man's subjection to God and his tie to humanity: Coriolanus would 'stand, / As if a man were author of himself / And knew no other kin'. But at this point, with his alienation from humanity destroying the very virtue inherent in the aristocratic...
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Selbst, Substanz und Subjekt: die ethische und politische Relevanz der ...

Heiko Joosten - Ethics, Modern - 2005 - 295 pages
...Shakespeares Coriolanus von 1608 ausdrücken: „I'll never/ be such a gosling äs to obey instinct, but stand / As if a man were author of himself, / And knew no other kin." Auch den Selbstschilderungen des Michel de Montaigne in seinen Essais etwa kommt es weniger auf das...
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Spirit, Soul, and City: Shakespeare's Coriolanus

Jan H. Blits - Drama - 2006 - 243 pages
...join Rome's enemy. In the fourth, ready to attack Rome, he is beseeched by his family, and, unable to "stand / As if a man were author of himself / And knew no other kin" (5.3.35-37), abandons Rome's enemy and is, at once, reunited with and permanently separated from his...
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King John

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2011 - 352 pages
...alike. The Bastard's "I am I, howe'er I was begot" — a comic forerunner of Coriolanus' tragic vow to "stand / As if a man were author of himself / And knew no other kin" (5.3) — is both true and false. There is certainly an "I" that remains in the speaking voice throughout...
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Shakespeare's Late Style

Russ McDonald - Literary Criticism - 2006
...grammatical equivalent of his famous desire for freedom from familial or other kinds of relation, his desire to "stand / As if a man were author of himself, / And knew no other kin" (5.3.35-37). Such values and patterns are appropriate to tragedy, a mode which moves toward separation...
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The Mind According to Shakespeare: Psychoanalysis in the Bard's Writing

Marvin Bennett Krims - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 218 pages
...resolve by disavowing his bond with them: * * * ... I'll never Be such a gosling to obey instinct, but stand, As if a man were author of himself And knew no other kin. 5.3.37-40 * * * Of course, his subjunctive "as if a man were author of himself" completely undermines...
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"Whom Can We Trust Now?": The Meaning of Treason in the United States, from ...

Brian F. Carso (Jr.) - History - 2006 - 266 pages
...identity that Socrates acknowledged. He repudiates his constitutive attachments by imagining that he can stand "as if a man were author of himself / and knew no other kin.'* 46 Furthermore, to counter his own self-made alienation, he envisions an alternative place to which...
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How to Read a Poem

Terry Eagleton - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2007 - 182 pages
...this new-fangled, bourgeois idea of self-proprietorship or possessive individualism, in which it is 'as if a man were author of himself / And knew no other kin' (Corlolanus). Shakespeare usually regards this fantasy of selfauthorship, in which one sunders all...
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The Cambridge Introduction to Shakespeare's Tragedies

Janette Dillon - Literary Criticism - 2007
...confirm the unnaturalness of such a resolution: I'll never Be such a gosling to obey instinct, but stand As if a man were author of himself And knew no other kin. (5.3.34—7) Lear, damaged in a way that Coriolanus is not, by unloving and unnatural daughters, learns...
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