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Books Books 51 - 60 of 178 on Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd....
" Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly ; and but for these vile guns He would himself have been a soldier. "
From Bull Run to Chancellorsville: The Story of the Sixteenth New York ... - Page 272
by Newton Martin Curtis - 1906 - 384 pages
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The works of Shakspeare: from the text of Johnson, Steevens, and Reed

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, Isaac Reed, George Steevens - 1825 - 896 pages
...inward bruise ; And that it was great pity, so it was, That villainous saltpetre should be digg'd Oat subjects had destroy 'd So cowardly; and, but for these vile guns, He would himself have been a soldier. This...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare: with glossarial notes, a sketch of ...

William Shakespeare, Charles Henry Wheeler - 1825 - 908 pages
...inward bruise ; And that It Ťas great pity, so It iras, That villanuus saltpetre should be dlgg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall t fellow had destroy'd So cowardly ; and but for these vile guns He would himself have been a soldier....
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Cumberland's British Theatre, with Remarks, Biographical and Critical ...

English drama - 1826
...Was parmaceti for an inward bruise ; And that it was great pity, so it was, That villanous saltpetre should be digg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly ; and, but for -these vile guns, He would himself have been.a soldier. This...
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King Richard II. King Henry IV, part 1. King Henry IV, part 2. Henry V

William Shakespeare, Samuel Weller Singer, Charles Symmons - 1826
...parmaceti, for an inward bruise8; And that it was great pity, so it was, That villanous salt-petre should be digg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly ; and, but for these vile guns, He would himself have been a soldier. This...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text by G. Steevens and E ...

William Shakespeare - 1826
...engrave. 4 Took it in snuff:] Snuff is equivocally used for anger, and a powder taken up the nose. Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly ; and, but for these vile guns, He would himself have been a soldier. This...
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The Beauties of Shakspeare Regularly Selected from Each Play. With a General ...

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 345 pages
...Was permaceti, for an inward bruise; And that it was great pity, so it was, That villanous salt-petre should be digg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall§ fellow had destroy'd So cowardly; and, but for these vile guns, He would himself have been a soldier. * A...
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An Essay on Elocution: With Elucidatory Passages from Various Authors

J[ohn] H[anbury]. Dwyer - Elocution - 1828 - 298 pages
...parmaceti, for an inward bruise ; And that it was great pity, so it was, That villanous salt-petre should be digg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy^ . * So cowardly : and but for these vile guns He would himself hare been a soldier." HENRT...
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare: With a Life, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1828
...r;imi;u'i'U- for an inward bruise; And that it was great pity, so it was, That villanous salt-petre shonkt be digg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy 'd .So cowardly ; and, but for these vile guns, He would h'imself have been a soldier....
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An Illustration of the Principles of Elocution ...

William Brittingham Lacey - Elocution - 1828 - 300 pages
...inward bruise ; And that it was great pity, so it was, That villainous salt-petre should be tligg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly. Shakespeare. SECTION IV. Of Time. Time refers either to single letters and...
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Pelham, Or, The Adventures of a Gentleman, Volume 1

Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton - English fiction - 1828
...she be ? GEORGE WITHERS. - It was a great pity, so it was, That villanous saltpetre should be digged Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroyed. First Part of King Henry IV. SEVERAL days passed. I had taken particular pains to ingratiate...
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