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Books Books 91 - 100 of 148 on These violent delights have violent ends, And in their triumph die, like fire and....
" These violent delights have violent ends, And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which as they kiss consume : the sweetest honey Is loathsome in his own deliciousness And in the taste confounds the appetite : Therefore love moderately ; long... "
The plays of William Shakspeare, with the corrections and illustr. of ... - Page 292
by William Shakespeare - 1809
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William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare, Sharon Linnea - Literary Criticism - 1984 - 118 pages
...religious duty, restates the church's warning about their passion: These violent delights have violent ends And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which, as they kiss, consume. (II,vi,9-U) Again, the lovers' passion is compared to a brilliant light that goes out as soon as it's...
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Shakespeare's Tragedies: An Introduction

Dieter Mehl - Drama - 1986 - 272 pages
...us as a definitive evaluation of the young people's love: These violent delights have violent ends, And in their triumph die like fire and powder, Which as they kiss consume. (11.6.9-11) This is the voice of experience and wisdom, not a confident verdict. The very diversity...
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Shakespeare and the Triple Play: From Study to Stage to Classroom

Sidney Homan - Literary Criticism - 1988 - 239 pages
...changes, Shakespeare insists upon exercising the proper "limit": "The sweetest honey / Is loathesome in his own deliciousness / And in the taste confounds...Therefore love moderately: long love doth so; / Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow" (Romeo and Juliet, 2.6.11-15). No less, he was sensitive to the possibility...
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Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare, Alan Durband - Drama - 1990 - 285 pages
...dare. It is enough I may but call her mine. Friar Lawrence These violent delights have violent ends, 10 And in their triumph die; like fire and powder, Which,...appetite. Therefore love moderately: long love doth so; 15 Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow. [Enter Juliet] Here comes the lady. O, so light a foot Will...
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Romantic Medicine and John Keats

Hermione de Almeida - Literary Criticism - 1990 - 432 pages
...confounds the appetite," Friar Lawrence says to Romeo in warning that "violent delights have violent ends / And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, / Which as they kiss consume."9 Christopher Ricks is correct in noting that Keats evokes honey and its attributes not just...
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The Columbia Granger's Dictionary of Poetry Quotations

Edith P. Hazen - Literary Criticism - 1992 - 1132 pages
...joyThat one short minute gives me in her sight. (II, vi) 149 These violent delights have violent ends Grasshopper Happy Insect, happy Thou, Dost neither Age, nor Winter know. Bu (II, vi) 150 Come, civil night, Thou sober-suited matron all in black. And learn me how to lose a winning...
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Everybody's Shakespeare: Reflections Chiefly on the Tragedies

Maynard Mack - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 279 pages
...signify? Like the blaze of gunpowder, says Friar Laurence: These violent delights have violent ends And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which, as they kiss, consume. (2.6.9) To be sure, the friar is an old man, skeptical of youth's ways; yet can we help reflecting...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1996 - 1263 pages
...— It is enough I may but call her mine. FRIAR LAURENCE. These violent delights have violent ends, figure innocence, The dove and very blessed arrives as tardy as too slow. — Here comes the lady: — O, so light a foot Will ne'er wear out the...
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Shakespeare the Playwright: A Companion to the Complete Tragedies, Histories ...

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 1996 - 865 pages
...their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which as they kiss consume. The sweetest honey Is loathesome in his own deliciousness, And in the taste confounds...Therefore love moderately: long love doth so; Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow. (II, vi, 9-15) The words are meant benignly, but they are unrealistic....
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Shakespeare the Playwright: A Companion to the Complete Tragedies, Histories ...

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 1996 - 865 pages
...hurtling swiftly, the Friar offers Romeo one more warning: These violent delights have violent ends. And in their triumph die, like fire and powder. Which as they kiss consume. The sweetest honey Is loathesome in his own deliciousness, And in the taste confounds the appetite. Therefore love moderately:...
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