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Books Books 21 - 25 of 25 on I think a little change has taken place in my intellect lately — I cannot bear....
" I think a little change has taken place in my intellect lately — I cannot bear to be uninterested or unemployed, I, who for so long a time have been addicted to passiveness. "
Life, letters, and literary remains, of John Keats - Page 96
by Richard Monckton Milnes (1st baron Houghton.) - 1848
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The Challenge of Keats: Bicentenary Essays 1795-1995

Allan C. Christensen - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 313 pages
...onwards, Keats lived in a progressively voracious state of self-enclosure, admitting to his brothers that a little change has taken place in my intellect lately...productions, than a very gradual ripening of the intellectual powers.41 By now Keats was aware of being strong and determined although physically frail, and ever...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 13

Allardyce Nicoll - Drama - 2002 - 200 pages
...determination and strength.' I call attention first to the sentences, ' Nothing is finer for the purpose of great productions than a very gradual ripening of the intellectual powers. As an instance of this ... I sat down yesterday to read "King Lear" once again.' Their meaning is not clear. But Keats has...
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Cultural Amnesia: Necessary Memories from History and the Arts

Clive James - Literary Collections - 2007 - 876 pages
...with which we find it so much harder to come to terms than our ancestors did with mere regret. ttt Nothing is finer for the purposes of great productions...very gradual ripening of the intellectual powers. — KEATS TO HIS BROTHER, JANUARY 23, 1818 COMING FROM KEATS, the remark was either generous or nervous....
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Studies and Essays

...ambition would be to furnish this lens. KEATS'S "PRELUDE" A STUDY OF THE POEMS OF KEATS UP TO ENDYMION "NOTHING is finer for the purposes of great productions than a very gradual ripening of the intellectual powers1," writes Keats in 1818, just on emerging from the first period of darkness we are entering...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 166

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, Sir John Murray IV, William Smith, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle) - English literature - 1888
...particular.' In other letters of nearly the same date, he writes of the development of his powers : - I think a little change has taken place in my intellect lately ; I cannot bear to bo uninterested or unemployed, I, who for so long a time have been addicted to passiveness. Nothing...
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