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Books Books 101 - 110 of 135 on I'll speak a little. [He holds her by the hand, silent] CORIOLANUS. O mother, mother!....
" I'll speak a little. [He holds her by the hand, silent] CORIOLANUS. O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome;... "
The Plays of William Shakspeare ... - Page 499
by William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1785
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Shakespeare: A Life in Drama

Stanley Wells - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 416 pages
...submission which is also a moment of self-examination and an acceptance of his fate. O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother, O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your son,...
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Coriolanus on Stage in England and America, 1609-1994

John Ripley - Performing Arts - 1998 - 431 pages
...come who replies — ] Ay, by and by; [The curtains of the gate close.] (Alone) O, mother, my mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and smile in dismal wonder As at one forsworn. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to...
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Tragic Instance: The Sequence of Shakespeare's Tragedies

Ralph Berry - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 228 pages
...attainment of his role. His final words to his mother speak not of love, but of fear: O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your son...
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Shakespeare Survey: Volume 53, Shakespeare and Narrative: An Annual Survey ...

Peter Holland - Drama - 2000 - 357 pages
...depart; Coriolanus in his next speech refers to their encounter in the past tense: О mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. О my mother, mother, O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your son,...
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Shakespeare and Masculinity

Bruce R. Smith - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 182 pages
...melting spirits of women'. Coriolanus's manhood cracks under Vblumnia's importuning: O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. (5.3.183-6) Antony's transformation is just as dramatic: 'His captain's heart,...
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Recreating Ancient History: Episodes from the Greek and Roman Past in the ...

Karl A. E. Enenkel, Jan L. De Jong, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Alicia Montoya - History - 2002 - 375 pages
...mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do open, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your son, believe it, O, believe it, 31 Eagleton T., William Shakespeare (Oxford: 1986)73. Most dangerously...
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Shakespeare's Noise

Kenneth Gross - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 282 pages
...with the knowledge of his mother's "victory" and the mortal danger he now inhabits: O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your son,...
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The Tragedie of Coriolanus

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...himself before the tribunes, has given her her triumph. He holds her hand a moment before he speaks: 'O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But, for your son, — believe it, O, believe it, Most dangerously you have with him prevail'd, If not most mortal...
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Shakespeare: la invención de lo humano

Characters and characteristics in literature - 2001 - 734 pages
...descubrió que había terminado con la tragedia, tanto como con la pura comedia. 8. O mother, mother! / What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, /The gods look down, and this unnatural scene /They laugh at. O my mother, mother! Ol /You have won a happy victory to Rome: / But for your...
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The Sound of Shakespeare

Wes Folkerth - Drama - 2002 - 147 pages
...mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But, for your son, believe it - O, believe it Most dangerously you have with him prevail'd, If not most mortal to...
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