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Books Books 121 - 130 of 130 on I'll speak a little. [He holds her by the hand, silent] CORIOLANUS. O mother, mother!....
" I'll speak a little. [He holds her by the hand, silent] CORIOLANUS. O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome;... "
The Plays of William Shakspeare ... - Page 499
by William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1785
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Aged by Culture

Margaret Morganroth Gullette - Psychology - 2004 - 267 pages
...was an "inarguable" moment of theater, as Herbert Blau describes such moments.45 Oh mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. (V.iii.182-85) Fiennes is notable for his posture, rigid almost beyond the perpendicular....
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Patterns in Shakespearian Tragedy

Irving Ribner - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 205 pages
...Coriolanus knows that his decision to spare Rome must also mean his own death : O mother, mother I What have you done ? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! Ol You have won a happy victory to Rome; But, for your son,...
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Style: Essays on Renaissance and Restoration Literature and Culture in ...

Allen Michie, Eric Buckley, Harriett Hawkins - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 296 pages
...especially eloquent. He knows that his mercy will have a disastrous effect on his present situation: O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But, for your son—believe it, O, believe it!— Most dangerously you have with him prevailed, If not most mortal...
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Shakespeare

George Ian Duthie - Literary Criticism - 1951 - 206 pages
...himself which is involved in his sparing Rome. But, despite this, nature prevails. O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy \ ictory to Rome; But, for your son,...
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Why Shakespeare: An Introduction to the Playwright's Art

G. M. Pinciss - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 192 pages
...Rome, his life is put in jeopardy, but he also knows that he has never been capable of refusing her: O mother, mother! O You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your son — believe it, O believe it! — Most dangerously have you with him prevailed, If not most mortal...
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Stanley Cavell's American Dream: Shakespeare, Philosophy, and Hollywood Movies

Lawrence F. Rhu - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 248 pages
...what, following Lady Macbeth, we may call his "human kindness" (emphasis added): O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother, O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your son,...
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Acts of Criticism: Performance Matters in Shakespeare and His Contemporaries ...

Paul Nelsen, June Schlueter, James P. Lusardi - Literary Collections - 2006 - 275 pages
...protagonist capitulates to his mother and decides to spare his native city of Rome: O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O mv mother, mother! O! (5.3.182-85) Unlike Hamlet, Coriolanus is an inarticulate...
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Spirit, Soul, and City: Shakespeare's Coriolanus

Jan H. Blits - Drama - 2006 - 243 pages
...is not Mars, but Martius.'6 "O mother, mother! / What have you done?" Coriolanus finally exclaims. "Behold, the heavens do ope, / The gods look down, and this unnatural scene /They laugh at" (5.3.182-85). Coriolanus sees himself as acting a part before the gods. He is...
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Religion, Culture and Society in Early Modern Britain: Essays in Honour of ...

Anthony Fletcher, Peter Roberts - History - 2006 - 396 pages
...(3.2.14-16) Like a dull actor now I have forgot my part and I am out, Even to a full disgrace. (5.3.40-2) Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. (5.3.183-5) 61 Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and his World, trans. Helene Iswolsky...
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The Quest for Shakespeare

Joseph Pearce - Biography & Autobiography - 2008 - 275 pages
...willingness to attack Rome and yet laments that his failure to do so might prove costly, even deadly: O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But, for your son, — believe it, O, believe it, Most dangerously you have with him prevail'd, If not most mortal...
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