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Books Books 91 - 100 of 140 on I'll speak a little. [He holds her by the hand, silent] CORIOLANUS. O mother, mother!....
" I'll speak a little. [He holds her by the hand, silent] CORIOLANUS. O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome;... "
The Plays of William Shakspeare ... - Page 499
by William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1785
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The Plays of Shakespeare with the Poems, Volume 3

William Shakespeare, Howard Staunton - 1860
...And then I'll speak a little. COB. [After holding VOLUMNIA by the hand, Ğilent.~\ O mother, mother ! blessing. — Lady, Dear queen, that ended when' I but began, Give me that hand of yours to scene They laugh at. — O, my mother, mother ! O ! You have won a happy victory to Rome ; But, for...
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The plays (poems) of Shakespeare, ed. by H. Staunton, the illustr. by J ...

William Shakespeare - 1860
...then I'll speak a little. Сов. [After holding VOLUMNIA by the hand, süent.'] O mother, mother ! scene They laugh at. — O, my mother, mother ! О ! You have won a happy victory to Rome ; But, for...
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Shakespeare's Tragedies: An Introduction

Dieter Mehl - Drama - 1986 - 272 pages
...sees his mother's victory as a personal defeat from which only Rome will profit: O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your son,...
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T. S. Eliot: The Poems

Martin Scofield - Literary Criticism - 1988 - 264 pages
...and his humanity reasserts itself, as he responds to his mother's silent appeal: O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold the heavens do ope. The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. (V.iii. 182-4) The statesman in Eliot's poem also appeals to a mother, for some...
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Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare's Plays ...

Janet Adelman - Drama - 1992 - 379 pages
...require his death, and he embraces that death with a passivity thoroughly uncharacteristic of him: O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your son, believe it, O, believe it, Most dangerously you have with him prevail'd, If not most mortal to...
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Shakespearean Pragmatism: Market of His Time

Lars Engle - Drama - 1993 - 266 pages
...the gods he has tried to support, and from whom he has expected support in turn: O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope. The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. (5.3.182) At what do the gods laugh? Partly at the spectacle of a noble opponent...
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Everybody's Shakespeare: Reflections Chiefly on the Tragedies

Maynard Mack - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 279 pages
..."Come to my woman's breasts And take my milk for gall, you murd'ring ministers" (Macbeth, 1.5.45). "Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at" (Coriolanus, 5.3.183). 4 This was one way of bridging the gulf between tiring-house...
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The Tragedy of Coriolanus

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1998 - 388 pages
...admits, 'Like a dull actor now | I have forgot my part' (5.3.40-1), and, having succumbed, cries out, 'Behold, the heavens do ope, | The gods look down, and this unnatural scene | They laugh at' (5.3.184-6). The significance of this revulsion from acting and the symbolic...
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Shakespeare, the King's Playwright: Theater in the Stuart Court, 1603-1613

Alvin B. Kernan - Drama - 1995 - 230 pages
...spared Rome. Holding his mother "by the hand, silent," for a time, he bursts out, O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. (5.3.182) But the tragic recognition of his fate and its acceptance are only temporary....
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Shakespeare the Playwright: A Companion to the Complete Tragedies, Histories ...

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 1996 - 865 pages
...directed to hold his mother's hand and stand in silence. Suddenly he bursts out: O, mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope. The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! (V, iii, 182-185) The great comedy and tragedy of his...
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