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Books Books 31 - 40 of 173 on For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble....
" For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and... "
Life and Correspondence of David Hume ... - Page 76
by John Hill Burton - 1846 - 500 pages
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The World's Cyclopedia of Biography, Volume 3

Biography - 1883
...says Hume, " when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade,...any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception. When my perceptions are removed for any time, as by sound sleep, so long...
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The Human Mind: A Treatise in Mental Philosophy

Edward John Hamilton - Psychology - 1883 - 720 pages
...my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade,...any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception If any one, upon serious and unprejudiced reflection, thinks he has a different...
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The Philosophical Basis of Theism: An Examination of the Personality of Man ...

Samuel Harris - Knowledge, Theory of - 1883 - 564 pages
...Hume says : " When I enter intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never catch myself at any time' without a sensation and never can observe anything but the sensation." Another...
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The Human Intellect: With an Introduction Upon Psychology and the Soul

Noah Porter - Intellect - 1883 - 673 pages
...most intimately into whnt I call mytelf, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, oi heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I novcr can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception....
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Selections from Berkeley: With an Introduction and Notes

Alexander Campbell Fraser - Philosophy - 1884 - 374 pages
...my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other — of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure (ie something merely phenomenal). I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never...
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Selections from Berkeley: With an Introduction and Notes

Alexander Campbell Fraser - Philosophy - 1884 - 374 pages
...most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other—of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure (ie something merely phenomenal). I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never...
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Mental Science: A Text-book for Schools and Colleges

Edward John Hamilton - Psychology - 1886 - 416 pages
...my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade,...any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception. . . . If any one, upon serious and unprejudiced reflectien, thinks he...
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The Human Intellect: With an Introduction Upon Psychology and the Soul

Noah Porter - Intellect - 1886 - 673 pages
...intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, oi heal or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without & perception, and never can observe anything owi the perception."— Human Naturr, Part iv. tec, 2....
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Historical and critical

James McCosh - Philosophy - 1887
...impresses, and we are at once in the region of existences, internal and external. "I never," he says, "catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception." His very language contradicts itself. He talks of catching himself, what...
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A Treatise of Human Nature

David Hume - Emotions (Philosophy) - 1888 - 709 pages
...my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade,...and never can observe any thing but the perception. When my perceptions are remov'd for any time, as by sound sleep ; so long am I insensible of myself,...
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