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Books Books 41 - 50 of 184 on If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir. Ban. New....
" If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir. Ban. New honours come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest... "
A Few Notes on Shakespeare - Page 119
by Alexander Dyce - 1853 - 156 pages
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Tales of Fashion and Reality

Caroline Frederica Beauclerk, Henrietta Mary Beauclerk - American fiction - 1836 - 198 pages
...the form of Honoria. JOURNAL OF A CHAPERON. BY HENRIETTA MARY BEAUCLERK. Se non e v6ro E ben trovato. Come -what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Shakspeare. FROM time immemorial, marriage has been considered as the most happy and blissful state,...
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Select plays from Shakspeare; adapted for the use of schools and young ...

William Shakespeare - History - 1836
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour : — my dull brain was wrought...
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Winter's tale. Comedy of errors. Macbeth. King John. King Richard II. King ...

William Shakespeare, Charles Symmons, John Payne Collier - 1836
...the crown." 3 By his single state of man, Macbeth means his simple condition of human nature. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favor ; l — my dull brain was...
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Complete Works: With Dr. Johnson's Preface, a Glossary, and an Account of ...

William Shakespeare - 1838 - 926 pages
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould. But with the aid of use. Macb. over-rode him on the way ; And he is furnish 'd with no certainties, Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour: — my dull brain was wrought...
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Cranmer; by a member of the Roxburghe club

Thomas Frognall Dibdin, Reginald Cranmer (fict. name.) - 1839
...you met and overcame your Fiirstenhoff assailant !" " Just so : within the hour we shall be ready. ' Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day !"' So saying, both uncle and nephew betook themselves to the toilet ; and it must be confessed that...
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The works of William Shakespeare, the text formed from an entirely ..., Volume 7

John Payne Collier - 1843
...come upon him, Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give your favour : my dull brain waswrought With...
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The Works of Shakespere, Volume 2

William Shakespeare, Barry Cornwall, John Ogden, Richard H. Horne - 1843
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour: my dull brain was wrought...
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a ..., Volume 2

1843
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. linn. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour: my dull brain was wrought...
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The Works of William Shakspeare: The Text Formed from an Intirely ..., Volume 7

1843
...come upon him, Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give your favour : my dull brain was wrought...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Printed from the Text ..., Volume 5

1843
...upon him , Like our strange garments , cleave not to their mould , But 'with the aid of use. Much. Come what come may , Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth , we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give your favour : my dull brain was wrought...
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