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Books Books 21 - 23 of 23 on Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely,....
" Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs. If the reader has never paid attention to this matter, he will be both interested and astonished to learn how many different local bodily feelings... "
The Principles of Psychology - Page 450
by William James - 1918 - 704 pages
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Contemporary Psychology, Volume 17

Guido Villa - Philosophy - 2004 - 416 pages
...strike, or tremble, because we are sorry, angry, or fearful, as the case may be." l For " every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs." So that the most important points to be considered in an emotion are these somatic phenomena, which...
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Describing Inner Experience?: Proponent Meets Skeptic

Russell T. Hurlburt, Eric Schwitzgebel - Consciousness - 2007
...William James, for example, writes that "every one of the bodily changes [associated with emotion], whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs... . Our whole cubic capacity is sensibly alive; and each morsel of it contributes its pulsations of feeling,...
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The Integrative Action of the Nervous System

Charles Scott Sherrington - 1916 - 411 pages
...exciting fact, and that our feeling of the same changes as they occur IS the emotion. . . . Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT acutely...as characteristic of his various emotional moods. ...If we fancy some strong emotion and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it all the feelings...
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