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" Upon the subject of education, not presuming to dictate any plan or system respecting it, I can only say that I view it as the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in. That every man may receive at least a moderate education, and... "
The Early Life of Abraham Lincoln: Containing Many Unpublished Documents and ... - Page 129
by Ida Minerva Tarbell, John McCan Davis - 1896 - 240 pages
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A Century of Service: Land-Grant Colleges and Universities, 1890-1990

Ralph D. Christy, Lionel Williamson - Education - 1992 - 166 pages
...educational development of our human resources. As Abraham Lincoln said, "Upon the subject of education, I can only say that I view it as the most important subject that we as a people can be engaged in." As we approach the twenty-first century, let us review our...
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Liberal Nationalism

Yael Tamir - Philosophy - 1995 - 206 pages
...of community, as in ours, knowledge is proportionally essential." Every man, Lincoln claimed, should receive "at least a moderate education, and thereby be enabled to read the histories of his own and the other countries, by which he may duly appreciate the value of free institutions." If...
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Revolutions Revisited: Two Faces of the Politics of Enlightenment

Ralph Lerner - Political Science - 1994 - 136 pages
...urgent. Hence Lincoln (echoing the founders) could view popular education in the principles of the regime as "the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in." Perhaps nothing less would suffice: an entire people had to become passionately attached to a system...
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Out of the Wilderness: The Life of Abraham Lincoln

William Hanchett - Biography & Autobiography - 1994 - 151 pages
...railroads and for improving navigation upon rivers like the Sangamon and stated that education was the "most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in." In short, he described himself as a Henry Clay Whig who would use the power of government to improve...
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Lincoln and the Economics of the American Dream

G. S. Boritt - History - 1994 - 386 pages
...borrowing school funds to escape taxing. In his first platform Lincoln had declared education to be "the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in" — words that have been much quoted since. But in the House he sacrificed "the most important subject,"...
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Lincoln

David Herbert Donald - Biography & Autobiography - 1996 - 714 pages
...always be means found to cheat the law." Like other New Salem residents, he favored improving education, "the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in," though he offered no plan or program. In a concluding paragraph Lincoln spoke for himself, rather than...
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Of the People, by the People, for the People: And Other Quotations

Abraham Lincoln, G. S. Boritt - History - 1996 - 162 pages
...Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, v. 4, p. 58. Rutgers University Press ( 1953, 1990). EDUCATION I view it as the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in. "Communication to the People of Sangamo County," March 9, 1832, reprinted in Collected Works of Abraham...
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On Hallowed Ground: Abraham Lincoln and the Foundations of American History

John P. Diggins - History - 2000 - 330 pages
...himself: Upon the subject of education, not pretending to dictate any plan or system respecting it, I can only say that I view it as the most important...education, and thereby be enabled to read the histories of his own and other countries, by which he may duly appreciate the value of our free institutions, appears...
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Lincoln's Sacred Effort: Defining Religion's Role in American Self-government

Lucas E. Morel - History - 2000 - 251 pages
...genius.52 When Lincoln first ran for the Illinois General Assembly in 1832, he stated that education was "the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in." He added: "That every man may receive at least, a moderate education, and thereby be enabled to read...
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Abraham Lincoln: A New Birth of Freedom

Janet Benge, Geoff Benge - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2001 - 219 pages
...Next he outlined one of his favorite topics, the idea of free education for all children. He wrote: 'That every man may receive at least a moderate education and thereby be enabled to read the histories of his own and other countries, by which he may duly appreciate the value of our free institutions, appears...
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