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Books Books 31 - 40 of 176 on ... whate'er thou wilt, swift-footed Time, To the wide world and all her fading sweets;....
" ... whate'er thou wilt, swift-footed Time, To the wide world and all her fading sweets; But I forbid thee one most heinous crime: O! carve not with thy hours my love's fair brow, Nor draw no lines there with thine antique pen; Him in thy course untainted... "
Shakespeariana - Page 231
edited by - 1887
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Shakespeare's England: or, Sketches of our social history of the reign of ...

Walter Thornbury - Great Britain - 1856
...music ; " he says " dear my love," and alludes to his own early self-assurance of fame : — " Ah, do thy worst old Time, despite thy wrong, My love shall in my verse live ever young." The 20th contains a clear proof of its being a man whom he addressed, for he says...
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Shakspere's England; or, Sketches of our social history in the reign of ...

George Walter Thornbury - 1856
...music ; " he says " dear my love," and alludes to his own early self-assurance of fame : — " Ah, do thy worst old Time, despite thy wrong, My love shall in my verse live ever young." The 20th contains a clear proof of its being a man whom he addressed, for he says...
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The Plays & Poems of Shakespeare: Venus & Adonis. The rape of Lucrece ...

William Shakespeare, Edmond Malone - 1857
...with thine antique pen : Him in thy course untainted do allow, For beauty's pattern to succeeding men. Yet, do thy worst, old Time : despite thy wrong, My love shall in my verse ever live young. xz. A woman's face, with Nature's own hand painted, Hast thou, the master- mistress of my passion ;...
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1857
...with thine antique pen ; Him in thy course untainted do allow For beauty's pattern to succeeding men. Yet, do thy worst, old Time : despite thy wrong, My love shall in my verse ever live young. A woman's face, with Nature's own hand painted, Hast thou, the master-mistress of my passion ; A woman's...
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Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems, Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1858
...with thine antique pen ; Him in thy course untainted do allow, For beauty's pattern to succeeding men. Yet, do thy worst, old Time : despite thy wrong, My love shall in my verse ever live young. XX. A woman's face, with nature's own hand painted, Hast thou, the master-mistress of my passion ;...
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Proceedings, Volumes 12-13

Literary and Philosophical Society of Liverpool - 1858
...can breathe, as eye can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee." and in the 19th — " Yet do thy worst old Time, despite thy wrong ; My love shall in my verse ever live young." In the 55th, absorbing the whole stanza — "Not marble, not the gilded monuments Of princes shall...
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The sonnets of William Shakspere: rearranged and divided into four parts

William Shakespeare - 1859 - 120 pages
...eye in a fine phrensy rolling," and " suiting the action to the word," he bids defiance to Time, " Yet do thy worst, old Time, despite thy wrong, My love shall in my verse ever live young," describes the beauty of his love in the 20th Sonnet, being the culminating point, the Corinthian capital,,...
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The Pathfinder, a journal of independent religious reform, conducted by P.W ...

Philip William Perfitt - 1859
...suggested by Carlyle, as the unconscious — in his sonnets has given us the example, where he says — " Yet do thy worst, Old Time ; despite thy wrong My love shall in my verse ever live young." noble modesty he associates Hie idea of love with his immortality, and thus blunts the ñül force...
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The Plays of Shakespeare with the Poems, Volume 3

William Shakespeare, Howard Staunton - 1860
...with thine antique pen ; Him in thy course untainted do allow, For beauty's pattern to succeeding men. d : when he needs what you have gleaned, it is but squeezing you, and, sponge, you shall be XX. A woman's face, with Nature's own hand painted, Hast thou, the master-mistress of my passion ;...
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The Plays of Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1860
...with thine antique pen ; Him in thy course untainted do allow, For beauty's pattern to succeeding men. he folio read», And teene thee teaming forfeit», &c. ACT IT.] [SCENE v. AB to prenominate XX. A woman's face, with Nature's own baud painted, Hast thou, the master-mistress of my passion ;...
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