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Books Books 81 - 90 of 161 on What is't thou say'st?—Her voice was ever soft, Gentle and low, an excellent thing....
" What is't thou say'st?—Her voice was ever soft, Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman.— I kill'd the slave that was a-hanging thee. 275 Capt. 'Tis true, my lords, he did. Lear. Did I not, fellow? I have seen the day, with my good biting falchion... "
King Lear: Edited by Horace Howard Furness - Page 353
by William Shakespeare - 1880 - 503 pages
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1872
...Cordelia! stay a little. Ha! What is't thou say'st?—Her voice was ever soft, Gentle, and low,—an excellent thing in woman.— I kill'd the slave that was a-hanging thee. Off. 'Tis true, my lords, he did. Lear. Did I not, fellow? I have seen the day, with my good biting...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare - 1875 - 200 pages
...saved her; now she's gone for ever! Cordelia, Cordelia! stay a little. Ha! What is't thou say'st? Her voice was ever soft, Gentle, and low, an excellent...woman. I kill'd the slave that was a-hanging thee. Copt. 'Tis true, my lords, he did. Lear. Did I not, fellow ? I have seen the day, with my good biting...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare, Alan Durband - Juvenile Nonfiction - 1990 - 314 pages
...her; now she's gone for ever! 270 Cordelia, Cordelia! Stay a little. Ha! What is't thou say'st? Her voice was ever soft, Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman. I killed the slave that was a-hanging thee. Officer ‘Tis true, my lords, he did. Lear Did I not, fellow?...
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Selected Poems

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1995 - 128 pages
...saved her; now she's gone for ever. Cordelia, Cordelia, stay a little. Ha, What is't thou say'st? Her voice was ever soft, Gentle, and low - an excellent thing in woman. I killed the slave that was a-hanging thee. Did I not, fellow? I have seen the day, with my good biting...
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Teaching Modern Foreign Languages: A Handbook for Teachers

Carol Morgan, Peter Neil - Education - 2001 - 212 pages
...Jackie had been a woman seen but not heard—the ideal. When she spoke at all, it was in a whisper. "Her voice was ever soft / Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman," as Lear says of Cordelia. As a result, Onassis was the diametric opposite of Rodham Clinton, her silence...
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Gender Articulated: Language and the Socially Constructed Self

Kira Hall, Mary Bucholtz - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1995 - 512 pages
...had been a woman seen but not heard—the ideal. When she spoke at all, it was in a whisper. “Her voice was ever soft / Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman,” as Lear says of Cordelia. As a result, Onassis was the diametric opposite of Rodham Clinton, her silence...
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Lear from Study to Stage: Essays in Criticism

Arthur Hawley Scouten - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 305 pages
...(Dead silent, Cordelia achieves female excellence and redeems her fault of the opening scene: "Her voice was ever soft, / Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman.") Of course, speechless, Cordelia is deprived of obvious power to construct her own meanings. Dead, she...
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Language and Gender in American Fiction: Howells, James, Wharton, and Cather

Elsa Nettels - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 214 pages
...Shakespeare. King Lear gives the memorable expression of the ideal when he says of Cordelia: ‘Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low - an excellent thing in woman.' In The Taming of the Shrew, Shakespeare contrasts the ideal and its opposite: Bianca, the obedient...
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Reforging Shakespeare: The Story of a Theatrical Scandal

Jeffrey Kahan - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 271 pages
...his official story. Boaden is quick to point out another addition. Whereas Shakespeare has written, "What is't thou say'st-Her voice was ever soft, / Gentle and low; an excellent thing in woman," William-Henry rewrites and extends the passage to read: Whatte ist thou sayst herre Voyce was everre...
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The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays

Oscar Wilde, Peter Raby - Drama - 1998 - 368 pages
...Luke 7. 398 ever very low: Wilde echoes Lear, speaking of Cordelia, King Lear, V. iii. 274-5: 'Her voice was ever soft, | Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman.' 404 SD all the Court: this forms an impressive entrance. Tigellinus is the chief Roman ambassador....
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