Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 31 - 36 of 36 on Latins call imagination, from the image made in seeing, and apply the same, though....
" Latins call imagination, from the image made in seeing, and apply the same, though improperly, to all the other senses. But the Greeks call it fancy, which signifies appearance, and is as proper to one sense as to another. Imagination, therefore, is nothing... "
The Foundations of Normal and Abnormal Psychology - Page 124
by Boris Sidis - 1914 - 406 pages
Full view - About this book

Materialism and the Mind-body Problem

David M. Rosenthal - Philosophy - 2000 - 315 pages
...the Greeks call it fancy; which signifies appearance, and is as proper to one sense, as to another. IMAGINATION therefore is nothing but decaying sense; and is found in men, and many other living creatures, as well sleeping, as waking. The decay of sense in men waking, is not the decay of the motion...
Limited preview - About this book

Readings in Modern Philosophy, Vol. 1: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz and ...

Roger Ariew, Eric Watkins - Philosophy - 2000 - 313 pages
...the Greeks call it fancy, which signifies appearance, and is as proper to one sense as to another. IMAGINATION therefore is nothing but decaying sense, and is found in men and many other living creatures, as well sleeping, as waking. The decay of sense in men waking is not the decay of the motion...
Limited preview - About this book

The Library of Original Sources: Volume VI (Advance in Knowledge 1650-1800)

Oliver J. Thatcher - History - 2004 - 460 pages
...the Greeks call it fancy; which signifies appearance, and is as proper to one sense, as to another. IMAGINATION therefore is nothing but decaying sense; and is found in men, and many other living creatures, as well sleeping, as waking. The decay of sense in men waking, is not the decay of the motion...
Limited preview - About this book

The Moving Tablet of the Eye: The Origins of Modern Eye Movement Research

Nicholas Wade, Benjamin Tatler - Medical - 2005 - 312 pages
...appear to imply a more image-like pictorial notion of representation. For example, Hobbes states that 'IMAGINATION, therefore, is nothing but decaying sense; and is found in men, and many other living Creatures, as well sleeping, as waking' (p. 15, original italics and capitals). The reference to imagination...
Limited preview - About this book

Metaphysical Hazlitt: Bicentenary Essays

Uttara Natarajan, Tom Paulin, Duncan Wu - Literary Collections - 2005 - 188 pages
...the Greeks call it Fancy; which signifies apparence, and is as proper to one sense, as to another. IMAGINATION therefore is nothing but decaying sense: and is found in men, and many other living Creatures, as well sleeping, as waking.7 Wordsworth's assertion of the independent life of certain...
Limited preview - About this book

Deductive Irrationality: A Commonsense Critique of Economic Rationalism

Stephen McCarthy, David Kehl - Business & Economics - 2008 - 284 pages
...But the Greeks call it fancy: which signifies appearance, and is proper to one sense, as to another. Imagination therefore is nothing but decaying sense; and is found in men, and many other living creatures, as well sleeping as waking. (Hobbes 1962, 23, spelling modernized) Locke would seem to imply,...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF