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Books Books 91 - 100 of 160 on For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them....
" For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are; nay, they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them. "
The Methodist Quarterly Review - Page 149
1858
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Language Machines: Technologies of Literary and Cultural Production

Jeffrey Masten - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1997 - 275 pages
...how Bookes demeane themtelves as well as men; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do tharpest justice on them as malefactors: For Books are not absolutely dead things, but due contain a potencle of life in them to be as active as that soule was whote progeny they are; nay...
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Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - Reference - 1998 - 669 pages
...trip about him at command. 7456 'Arcades' Such sweet compulsion doth in music lie. 7457 Areopagitica 1 Pericles This world to me is but a ceaseless storm Whirring me from my friends. 10442 Richard I that soul was whose progeny they are. 7458 Areopagitica As good almost kill a man as kill a good book:...
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Is There a Meaning in This Text?: The Bible, the Reader, and the Morality of ...

Kevin J. Vanhoozer - Religion - 2009 - 512 pages
...interaction. H. Richard Niebuhr2 He that owneth his words and actions, is the Author. Thomas Hobbes5 Books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul whose progeny they are. . . . As good kill a man as kill a good book: who kills a man kills...
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The Cambridge Companion to Milton

Dennis Danielson - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 297 pages
...Milton has no quarrel with the proposition that the state should 'have a vigilant eye how Bookes demeane themselves, as well as men; and thereafter to confine,...imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors' (YP 1: 491, 494, 531, 560, 569). Milton, however, posits an exchange in which a stationer is asked...
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Speaking Into the Air: A History of the Idea of Communication

John Durham Peters - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2000 - 293 pages
...any possibility of interaction. Socrates would perhaps agree with John Milton, with a shiver, that "books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them."" Here the Phaedrus foreshadows the blossoming of a wide array of discourses in the second half of the...
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Romantic Poets and the Culture of Posterity

Andrew Bennett - Literary Criticism - 1999
...said to amount to a belated transformation of Milton's argument in Areopagitica, that 'books . . . contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul whose progeny they are', that they 'preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction...
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Daniel Deronda

George Eliot, John Walter Cross - 1909
...unborn, and who though dead was yet to speak with him in those written memorials which, says Milton, " contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul whose progeny they are," he seemed to himself to be touching the electric chain of his own...
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A Short History of Europe, 1600-1815: Search for a Reasonable World

Lisa Rosner, John Theibault - History - 2000 - 450 pages
...Church and Commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how Books demean themselves, as well as men. . . . For Books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are — And yet on the other hand unless wariness be used, as good...
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Liberty: Its Meaning and Scope

Mordecai Roshwald - Philosophy - 2000 - 204 pages
...characteristically lofty language by John Milton in his defense of liberty from censorship of the printed word: "For Books are not absolutely dead things, but do...contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are; nay they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction...
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The Constitutional Protection of Freedom of Expression

Richard Moon - Law - 2000 - 312 pages
...interference from the state. Milton 1927, 4-5, regarded the printed word as the expression of reason: '[B]ooks are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul whose progeny they are; nay they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction...
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